Larry Cordle

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Larry Cordle
Born (1949-11-16) November 16, 1949 (age 65)
Origin USA
Genres Bluegrass
Country
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter
Musician
Instruments Guitar
Vocals
Years active 199x-present
Labels Sugar Hill, Shell Point, Lonesome Day
Associated acts Carl Jackson, Jerry Salley

Larry Cordle (November 16, 1949) was born in eastern Kentucky and is an American country and bluegrass singer-songwriter. Cordle is most famous for his song "Murder on Music Row", which was recorded by George Strait and Alan Jackson and received the CMA Award for Song of the Year in 2000.

Career[edit]

Cordle has written songs for Garth Brooks ("Against the Grain", also recorded by The Oak Ridge Boys), Mountain Heart ("Bitter Harvest"), Ricky Skaggs ("Callin' Your Name", "Highway 40 Blues", "Heartbreak Hurricane"), Loretta Lynn ("Country In My Genes"), George Strait ("Hollywood Squares"), Trisha Yearwood ("Lonesome Dove"), Kathy Mattea ("Lonesome Standard Time"), Diamond Rio ("Mama, Don't Forget To Pray For Me") and Bradley Walker ("When I'm Hurtin'") .

Cordle also has a career of his own, with his band Lonesome Standard Time. He founded the band in 1990 with his friend Glen Duncan. He received a Grammy nomination for the group's debut album, self-titled, in 1992. In 2005 Cordle's band played at the Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival. On his album 2007 "Took Up and Put Down", his sings "The First Train Robbery"; a song about the Reno Gang written from brother William Reno's perspective.[1]

Along with friends Carl Jackson and Jerry Salley, the trio (Cordle, Jackson & Salley) recorded the song “You’re Running Wild” on the Louvin Brothers Tribute on Universal South Records, which features numerous country music stars singing songs made famous by the legendary duo. Entitled Livin', Lovin', Losin': Songs of the Louvin Brothers, this project won the 2004 Grammy for Country Album Of The Year. The trio tours across the country and performs the hits they wrote for others.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival", Strings, newsletter of the Pineridge Bluegrass Folklore Society, October 2005.

External links[edit]