Las Campanas Observatory

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Las Campanas Observatory
From background left to foreground right, the du Pont, Swope, and twin Magellan telescopes.
Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory
Organization Carnegie Institution for Science
Code 304  
Location Atacama Region, Chile
Coordinates
Altitude 2,380 metres (7,810 ft)
Established 1971 (1971)
Website
Las Campanas Observatory
Telescopes
Magellan Telescopes 6.5 m reflectors
du Pont Telescope 2.5 m reflector
Warsaw Telescope 1.3 m reflector
Swope Telescope 1 m reflector

Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) is an astronomical observatory owned and operated by the Carnegie Institution for Science (CIS). It is located in the southern Atacama Desert of Chile in the Atacama Region approximately 100 kilometres (62 mi) northeast of the city of La Serena. The LCO telescopes and other facilities are located near the northern end of a 7 km (4.3 mi) long mountain ridge. Cerro Las Campanas, near the southern end and over 2,500 m (8,200 ft) high, is the future home of the Giant Magellan Telescope.

LCO was established in 1969 and is the primary observing facility of CIS. It supplanted Mount Wilson Observatory in that role due to increasing light pollution in the Los Angeles area. The headquarters of Carnegie Observatories is located in Pasadena, California, while the main office in Chile is in La Serena next to the University of La Serena and a short distance from the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy facility.[1]

Telescopes[edit]

Tenant telescopes[edit]

Former telescopes[edit]

Future telescopes[edit]

  • The Giant Magellan Telescope is a planned extremely large telescope that will be built at LCO, with completion expected in 2019. It is 24.5 m (80 ft) effective aperture design with seven 8.4 m (28 ft) segments. The telescope will have a light-gathering area of 368 m2 (3,960 sq ft), which is roughly fifteen times greater than one of the Magellan telescopes. The mirrors are being fabricated by the Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory, and the first was started in 2005.[16]

Discoveries[edit]

On February 24, 1987 at LCO, Ian Shelton and Oscar Duhalde became the first official observers of Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A).[14]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History | The Carnegie Observatories". The Carnegie Observatories. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  2. ^ "Magellan Telescopes (6.5m) | The Carnegie Observatories". The Carnegie Observatories. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  3. ^ "Magellan Telescopes — Las Campanas Observatory". Las Campanas Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  4. ^ "The du Pont Telescope | The Carnegie Observatories". The Carnegie Observatories. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  5. ^ "The Irénée du Pont Telescope — Las Campanas Observatory". Las Campanas Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  6. ^ "The Swope Telescope | The Carnegie Observatories". The Carnegie Observatories. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  7. ^ "The Henrietta Swope Telescope — Las Campanas Observatory". Las Campanas Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  8. ^ "General Description of OGLE". Warsaw University Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  9. ^ "All Sky Automated Survey - The ASAS-3 System". Warsaw University Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  10. ^ "HAT-South homepage". Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  11. ^ "High-Resolution Optical Spectroscopy - University of Birmingham". University of Birmingham. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  12. ^ "The NANTEN2 Telescope | NANTEN". University of Birmingham. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  13. ^ "Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito - Helen Sawyer Hogg Telescope". Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  14. ^ a b "SN1987A's Twentieth Anniversary". ESO Press Release: 8. 2007. Bibcode:2007eso..pres....8. 
  15. ^ "Pi of the Sky". Pi of the Sky. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 
  16. ^ "Overview - Giant Magellan Telescope". GMTO Corporation. Retrieved 2012-01-24. 

External links[edit]