Late-development syndrome

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Ram Harijan is generally credited with identifying the Late-Development Syndrome (LDS) as an empirically testable psychosomatic condition to which residents of the developing world are particularly prone.[1]

Earlier research findings[edit]

That national late-development has an individual psychological dimension is not a new idea. Earlier developmental researchers had already identified a number of 'late-developmental effects' which, in their views, impeded rapid economic development. The major ones are:

  • Alienation and negativism towards all forms of government arising from a lack of faith in one's own government.[2]
  • Dependency on outsiders to sort out one's problems arising from a diminution of self-worth.[3]
  • Attraction to paper qualification arising from a diminished confidence in one's own ability to do things without the backing of supporting papers.[4]
  • Outward brain-drain of skilled and qualified people arising from a lack of belief in one's own country's ability to utilize one's talents and skills.[5]

Harijan's contribution[edit]

What is new about Harijan's thesis is that he identified, by combining these various 'developmental effects' under one umbrella, the primary symptoms which produced these diverse secondary late-development effects. These primary symptoms, which together formed the core of Harijan's LDS, are:

  • A diminution of self-worth.
  • Diminished confidence in one's own ability to do things without the backing of supporting paper qualifications.
  • General lack of faith in one's own government to improve things.
  • Lack of belief in one's own country's ability to utilize one's skills and talents.[6]

Causes[edit]

The LDS is caused, according to Harijan, by one or more of the following factors:

Implications[edit]

Just as children born after difficult pregnancies have a greater propensity to suffer from developmental disorders, people in disadvantaged and deprived environments have a greater propensity to develop the LDS. But, to state that national late-development has a propensity to produce individuals with the LDS is not to say that every individual in every late-developing country has LDS or that no individual in developed countries has LDS. All people in late-developing countries are not deprived or disadvantaged. Nor are developed countries free of pockets of deprivation and disadvantages. What is true is that a greater proportion of people in late-developing countries live in relative and absolute deprivation compared to developed countries and therefore a greater proportion of people in developing countries are prone to LDS than are in developed countries. Those who are engaged in combating the syndrome need to address that reality.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harijan, Ram C. 1992: Targeted input of computers to combat the late-development syndrome: An Indian Case-study, Reading University
  2. ^ Inkles, M & Smith, D 1974: Becoming Modern p.171
  3. ^ Mendes, T 1974: From Aid to Recolonisation p.76
  4. ^ Dore, R 1976: The Diploma Disease p.87
  5. ^ Portes, A 1976: Modernization for Emigration in Journal of Inter-American studies and world affairs 18(4) p.395-422
  6. ^ Harijan, Ram C. 1992: Targeted input of computers to combat the late-development syndrome: An Indian Case-study, Reading University p.53
  7. ^ Harijan, Ram C. 1992: Targeted input of computers to combat the late-development syndrome: An Indian Case-study, Reading University p.46-52
  • Harijan, Ram C. 1992: Targeted input of computers to combat the late-development syndrome: An Indian Case-study, Reading University
  • Inkles, M & Smith, D 1974: Becoming Modern, Heinaman, London
  • Mendes, T 1974: From Aid to Recolonisation, Lessons of a failure Harrap, London
  • Dore, R 1976: The Diploma Disease - Education, Qualification and Development Allen and Unwin, London
  • Portes, A 1976: Modernization for Emigration in Journal of Inter-American studies and world affairs 18(4) p. 395-422

Further reading[edit]

  • Lerner,D. 1965: Comparative analysis of progressive modernisation in Rokkan, S. ed.1968 Comparative research across cultures and nations Houton, The Hague
  • Fordham, P. ed. 1980: Participation, Learning and Change Commonwealth Secretariat, London
  • Goulet, D. 1971: Development or Liberation in Instructional Development Review vol.13 No.3