Latimer, Iowa

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Latimer, Iowa
City
Location of Latimer, Iowa
Location of Latimer, Iowa
Coordinates: 42°45′46″N 93°22′8″W / 42.76278°N 93.36889°W / 42.76278; -93.36889Coordinates: 42°45′46″N 93°22′8″W / 42.76278°N 93.36889°W / 42.76278; -93.36889
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Franklin
Area[1]
 • Total 2.40 sq mi (6.22 km2)
 • Land 2.40 sq mi (6.22 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,240 ft (378 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 507
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 499
 • Density 211.3/sq mi (81.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 50452
Area code(s) 641
FIPS code 19-43590
GNIS feature ID 0458237

Latimer is a city in Franklin County, Iowa, United States. The population was 507 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

Latimer had its start in the year 1882 by the building of the Iowa Central railroad through that territory. It was named for its founder, J. F. Latimer.[4]

Geography[edit]

Latimer is located at 42°45′46″N 93°22′8″W / 42.76278°N 93.36889°W / 42.76278; -93.36889 (42.762896, -93.368873).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.40 square miles (6.22 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Year Pop. ±%
1910 378 —    
1920 359 −5.0%
1930 352 −1.9%
1940 416 +18.2%
1950 434 +4.3%
1960 445 +2.5%
1970 393 −11.7%
1980 441 +12.2%
1990 430 −2.5%
2000 535 +24.4%
2010 507 −5.2%
Source:"American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau.  and Iowa Data Center

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 507 people, 210 households, and 136 families residing in the city. The population density was 211.3 inhabitants per square mile (81.6/km2). There were 230 housing units at an average density of 95.8 per square mile (37.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.5% White, 0.2% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 7.3% from other races, and 0.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.1% of the population.

There were 210 households of which 31.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.2% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 21% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.07.

The median age in the city was 38.8 years. 24.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.6% were from 25 to 44; 22.2% were from 45 to 64; and 20.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.0% male and 54.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 535 people, 210 households, and 144 families residing in the city. The population density was 228.9 people per square mile (88.3/km²). There were 225 housing units at an average density of 96.3 per square mile (37.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.29% White, 2.06% Native American, 9.35% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.57% of the population.

There were 210 households out of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.0% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 21.5% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 28.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 88.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,028, and the median income for a family was $35,833. Males had a median income of $30,313 versus $21,042 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,332. About 2.9% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The CAL Community School District, located just south of Latimer and north Highway 3, serves the communities of Coulter, Alexander, and Latimer as well as the surrounding 117 square miles (300 km2) of agricultural farmland in Franklin County. The 2009-10 certified enrollment, counted October 1, 2009 was 274 students in grades K-12. The district also supports a prekindergarten program that enrolls nearly 100% of eligible three and four year olds for the past 25 years.

CAL Community School has been recognized many times over the years for its outstanding educational programs. In 1979 researchers from Boston University wrote an article based on their studies entitled "CAL Community School-Small, Rural, and Good!" that appeared in the April issue of the Phi Delta Kappa. In 1985-86, CAL received the Governor's Partnership in Education Award. In 1986-87, CAL High School was one of 256 schools nationwide to receive the United States Department of Education's Secondary Schools Recognition Award. In 1987-88, Secretary of Education William Bennett included CAL High School as one of seven exemplary high schools in his book, James Madison High School.

In 1991-92, the CAL Elementary School was one of 250 schools nationwide to receive the United States Department of Education Elementary Blue Ribbon School Award. In 2000-01, the CAL High School was recognized as a United States Department of Education Secondary Blue Ribbon School. In May 2001, TIME Magazine recognized CAL Community School when it named it Runner Up Elementary School in TIME's "Schools of the Year." TIME Magazine recognized CAL for using high school students to assist elementary students, pooling their knowledge with a neighboring district, moving ahead with a building expansion program, and using private donations and a federal construction grant to pay for facility improvements.

In 1998-99, the CAL and Dows Community School Districts entered into a two-way whole grade sharing agreement that lasted for the next seven years. During that time, both districts maintained separate elementary schools, the middle school (6-8) was at Dows, and the high school was at CAL. In 2005-06, the agreement ended after Dows entered into a new whole grade sharing agreement with Clarion-Goldfield. At that time, CAL Community School re-established its complete P/K-12 program.

The CAL facility has been well maintained and has undergone renovations in recent years. In 1986, a new gymnasium wing of the building was built replacing a portion of the building that was destroyed by a fire. In 2001, renovations were completed that included a six-classroom addition, new preschool room, renovated library media center and office space for Title I, Reading Recovery, and other programs. Recently, renovations were completed that included building a new chemistry/physics lab, converting the old lab into an art classroom, renovating the industrial arts/vocational agriculture area of the building, and other improvements such as restroom renovations, new flooring in the cafeteria, roof repairs, among others. In 2006 the new Cub Cadet Childcare Center was built on the CAL school grounds. In 2009, a new playground was completed in the school grounds. CAL has a history of maintaining excellent facilities.

CAL has many extracurricular activities as well, including a rich tradition of girls basketball. Franklin Consolidated (now CAL) was the State Consolation Champions in 19--. The program has now completed its fourth straight winning season with a record of 17-5 in the 2009-10 season. CAL also has rich traditions of success in track and softball.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  4. ^ Stuart, I. L. (1914). History of Franklin County, Iowa: A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and Achievement, Volume 1. S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 334. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]