Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

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Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album
Latin Grammy Awards of 2013
Awarded for alternative albums containing at least 51% of newly recorded material
Country United States
Presented by Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
First awarded 2004
Official website latingrammy.com

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album is an honor presented annually by the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and promotes a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally.[1] According to the category description guide for the 2012 Latin Grammy Awards, the award is for vocal or instrumental alternative albums containing at least 51 percent newly recorded material. It is awarded to solo artists, duos or groups.[2]

Mexican artists have received this award more than any other nationality, though it has also been presented to artists originating from Colombia, the United States, and Venezuela. The award was first given to Mexican group Café Tacuba for the album Cuatro Caminos at the 5th Latin Grammy Awards ceremony held in 2004.[3] Mexican performer Julieta Venegas is the only artist to have won in this category more than once. The Argentine band Babasónicos, and the mexican band Kinky with four nominations, share the record for most nominations without a win.

Recipients[edit]

A man in the right with a hat in a black outfit with his arms extended singing to a microphone and another man on the left with a black sweater over a white shirt playing the guitar.
Café Tacuba, the first winners in this category.
In the left a black man with sunglasses and a green jacket holding performing to a microphone beside him another man playing the saxophone, in the center blonde haired man playing the trombone and in the back a man with sunglasses and a yellow hat playing the percussion with his head down, and in the right a man with curly hair with sunglasses playing the trumpet beside him a bald man playing the guitar.
Ozomatli, the first and so far only American ensemble to win this category.
A woman in a purple dress singing to a microphone and playing the guitar.
Two-time winner Julieta Venegas
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Nationality[II] Work Nominees[III] Ref.
2004 Café Tacuba  Mexico Cuatro Caminos [3]
2005 Ozomatli  United States Street Signs [4]
2006 Julieta Venegas  Mexico Limón y Sal [5]
2007 Aterciopelados  Colombia Oye [6]
2008 Julieta Venegas  Mexico MTV Unplugged [7]
2009 Los Amigos Invisibles  Venezuela Comercial [8]
2010 Ely Guerra  Mexico Hombre Invisible
  • Banda de Turistas — Magical Radiophonic Heart
  • Bengala — Oro
  • El Cuarteto de Nos — Bipolar
  • Perrozompopo — CPC (Canciones Populares Contestatarias)
[9]
2011 Zoé  Mexico MTV Unplugged/Música de Fondo
  • Doctor Krápula — Corazón Bombea/Vivo
  • Fidel Nadal — Forever Together
  • Carla Morrison — Mientras Tu Dormias
  • Mr. Pauer — Soundtrack
[10]
2012 Carla Morrison Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico Déjenme Llorar
  • Lisandro Aristimuño — Mundo Anfibio
  • ChocQuibTown — Eso Es Lo Que Hay
  • Ulises Hadjis — Cosas Perdidas
  • Kinky — Sueño de la Máquina
[11]
2013 Natalia Lafourcade Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico Mujer Divina: Homenaje a Agustín Lara [12]

Notes[edit]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Latin Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] The nationality of the performing artist(s)
^[III] The name of the performer and the nominated album

References[edit]

General

  • "Past Winners Search". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2012. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved October 6, 2012. 

Specific

  1. ^ "Sobre La Academia Latina de la Grabación". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved July 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Category Guide". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Lista de nominados al los Grammy Latinos" (in Spanish). Terra Networks México. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ Espinoza, Ramón (November 2, 2005). "Complete list of 6th annual Latin Grammy nominations". USA Today (Gannett Company). Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  5. ^ "7th Annual Latin Grammy Winners List". Latin Grammy Awards (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2006. Archived from the original on June 4, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Lista completa de nominados al Latin Grammy". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. August 29, 2007. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved February 3, 2011. 
  7. ^ "9th Annual Latin Grammy Awards". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). September 10, 2007. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Conoce a los nominados a los Grammy Latinos". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. September 19, 2009. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  9. ^ "Latin Grammy nominees announced: Alejandro Sanz and Camila among top contenders". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). September 8, 2010. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Latin Grammys: The complete list of nominees". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. November 10, 2011. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Alternative". Latin Grammy Awards (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2012. Archived from the original on March 12, 2013. Retrieved March 31, 2013. 
  12. ^ Khoshaba, Christy (November 21, 2013). "Latin Grammys 2013: The complete list of winners and nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved February 9, 2014. 

External links[edit]