Latin Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Tropical Album

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Latin Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Tropical Album
Latin Grammy Awards of 2012
Awarded for vocal or instrumental tropical music albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material
Country United States
Presented by Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
First awarded 2002
Official website latingrammy.com

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Tropical Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and promotes a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally.[1] According to the category description guide for the 13th Latin Grammy Awards, the award is for vocal or instrumental contemporary tropical albums containing at least 51 percent playing time of newly recorded material. It is awarded to solo artists or groups; if the work is a tribute album or collection of live performances, the award is presented only to the directors or producers.[2]

The category included cumbia and vallenato recordings until the introduction of Best Cumbia/Vallenato Album at the 7th Annual Latin Grammy Awards in 2006. In January 2008, the award for Best Merengue Album was discontinued due to a shortage of submissions, resulting in merengue recordings becoming eligible in the Best Contemporary Tropical Album category.[3] The accolade for Best Contemporary Tropical Album was first presented to Colombia singer Carlos Vives at the 3rd Annual Latin Grammy Awards in 2002 for his album Déjame Entrar (2001). Vives holds the record for the most victories, with two.

Recipients[edit]

Year[I] Performing artist(s) Nationality[II] Work Nominees[III] Ref.
2002 Carlos Vives  Colombia Déjame Entrar
  • Felix D'Oleo — Frutos
  • Celso PiñaBarrio Bravo
  • Síntesis — Habana A Flor De Piel
  • Vocal SamplingCambio De Tiempo
[4]
2003 Rubén Blades  Panama Mundo [5]
2004 Albita  Cuba Albita Llegó [6]
2005 Carlos Vives  Colombia El Rock de Mi Pueblo [7]
2006 Olga Tañón  Puerto Rico Una Nueva Mujer [8]
2007 Oscar D'León  Venezuela Fuzionando [9]
2008 José Feliciano  Puerto Rico Señor Bachata [10]
2009 Omara Portuondo  Cuba Gracias
  • Coronel — Superstición
  • Eddy HerreraPaso Firme
  • Daniel SantacruzRadio Rompecorazones
  • Sin Ánimo De Lucro — Todo Pasa Por Algo
[11]
2010 Juan Luis Guerra  Dominican Republic A Son de Guerra [12]
2011 Tito El Bambino  Puerto Rico El Patrón: Invencible
  • Héctor Acosta — Obligame
  • Monchy & Nathalia — Monchy & Nathalia
  • Daniel SantacruzBachata Stereo
  • Paula Zuleta — Mezcla Soy
[13]
2012 Milly Quezada  Dominican Republic Aqui Estoy Yo
  • MaíaInstinto
  • GaitanesCaminos
  • Juan Formell and Los Van Van — La Maquinaria
  • Elaín — Volando Alto - Made on the Road
[14]

Notes[edit]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Latin Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] Showing only the nationality(ies) of the performing artist(s)
^[III] Showing the name of the performer and the nominated album

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Sobre La Academia Latina de la Grabación". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved July 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Category Guide". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ Manillow, Ian (November 13, 2008). "Where did merengue go? Olga Tañón fumes". Daily News (New York) (United States: Daily News, L.P.). Archived from the original on February 10, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2013. 
  4. ^ "4th Annual Latin Grammy Awards". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). 2002. Archived from the original on October 17, 2002. Retrieved January 17, 2013. 
  5. ^ "4th Annual Latin Grammy Awards" (PDF). Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). 2003. Archived from the original on October 10, 2003. Retrieved January 17, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Lista de nominados al los Grammy Latinos". Terra Networks (in Spanish) (Mexico: Telefónica). Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  7. ^ Espinoza, Ramón (November 2, 2005). "Complete list of 6th annual Latin Grammy nominations". USA Today (United States: Gannett Company). Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ "7th Annual Latin Grammy Winners List". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). 2006. Archived from the original on June 4, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Lista completa de nominados al Latin Grammy". Terra Networks (in Spanish) (Mexico: Telefónica). August 29, 2007. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved February 3, 2011. 
  10. ^ "9th Annual Latin Grammy Awards" (PDF). Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). June 30, 2008. Archived from the original on September 13, 2008. Retrieved December 15, 2012. 
  11. ^ "2009 Nominados > Video Musical". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). 2010. Archived from the original on February 10, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  12. ^ "7th Annual Latin Grammy Winners List". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). 2010. Archived from the original on November 26, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Latin Grammys: The complete list of nominees". Los Angeles Times (United States: Tribune Company). November 10, 2011. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Tropical". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences). November 30, 2012. Archived from the original on January 17, 2013. Retrieved January 17, 2013. 

External links[edit]