Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Vocal Album

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Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Vocal Album
Awarded for vocal rock, hard rock or metal albums containing at least 51% of newly recorded material
Country United States
Presented by Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
First awarded 2001
Last awarded 2009
Official website latingrammy.com

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Rock Solo Vocal Album was an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony conducted by the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences to "recognize excellence and create a wider awareness of the cultural diversity" and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally.[1] According to the category description guide for the 2009 Latin Grammy Awards, the award was given to vocal rock, hard rock or metal albums containing at least 51 percent of newly recorded material. It was given to a male or female artist.[2]

The award was first presented at the Latin Grammy Awards of 2001. Before its introduction, the rock categories were separated by gender and ensembles, with an additional award for Best Rock Album.[3][4] At the Latin Grammy Awards of 2010 two rock categories were presented, Rock Album and Best Rock Song. No information was released regarding the absence or possible withdrawal of the Best Rock Solo Vocal Album category.[5]

Argentinian artists have won the award more times than any other nationality. Colombian singer-songwriter Juanes has won the most awards in the category, with three wins out of the same number of nominations. Mexican performers Alejandra Guzmán and Julieta Venegas are the only female singers to be awarded. Fito Páez and Luis Alberto Spinetta are the most nominated performers, with four nominations each. Draco Rosa became the last recipient of the award in 2009, for the album Teatro.[6]

Recipients[edit]

A dark-haired woman, wearing a black corset with red applications and a black cloak, holding a microphone in her left hand and touching her face with her right hand.
Alejandra Guzmán won the award in 2001 with her tenth studio album, Soy
A man raising his hands and his head looking up.
Fito Páez won the award in 2007 for the album El Mundo Cabe en Una Canción
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Nationality[II] Work Nominees[III] Ref.
2001 Juanes  Colombia Fíjate Bien [7]
2002 Guzmán, AlejandraAlejandra Guzmán  Mexico Soy [8]
2003 Juanes  Colombia Un Día Normal [9]
2004 Venegas, JulietaJulieta Venegas  Mexico
  • Charly García – Rock & Roll Yo
  • Alejandra GuzmánLipstick
  • Fito Páez – Naturaleza Sangre
  • Luis Alberto Spinetta – Para los Arboles
[10]
2005 Juanes  Colombia Mi Sangre [11]
2006 Cerati, GustavoGustavo Cerati  Argentina Ahí Vamos [12]
2007 Páez, FitoFito Páez  Argentina El Mundo Cabe en Una Canción
  • Belo y los Susodichos – Pisando lo Fregao
  • Iván FerreiroLas Siete y Media
  • Rosendo Mercado – El Endémico Embustero y el Incauto Pertinaz
  • Ariel Rot – Dúos, Tríos y Otras Perversiones
[13]
2008 Calamaro, AndrésAndrés Calamaro  Argentina La Lengua Popular [14]
2009 Rosa, DracoDraco Rosa  United States Teatro [15]

Notes[edit]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Latin Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] The nationality of the performing artist(s).
^[III] The name of the performer and the nominated album

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sobre La Academia Latina de la Grabación". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved July 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Category Guide". Grammy Awards. Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. 2009. Archived from the original on February 14, 2010. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 
  3. ^ Associated Press (September 19, 2002). "List of winners at the 3rd annual Latin Grammy awards". Las Vegas Sun. The Greenspun Corporation. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Past Winners Search". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved September 2, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Latin Grammys 2010 – Complete Winners List". AOL. November 12, 2010. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  6. ^ Tijana, Ilich. "10th Annual Latin Grammy Awards - 2009 Winners". About.com. The New York Times Company. Retrieved Septiember 2, 2011.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  7. ^ "The Full List of Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). July 18, 2001. Retrieved September 2, 2011. 
  8. ^ "3rd Annual Latin Grammy Awards – Winners". Latin Grammy Awards. Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. September 18, 2002. Archived from the original on December 1, 2002. Retrieved December 1, 2012. 
  9. ^ "The nominees are ...". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). July 23, 2003. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Lista de nominados al los Grammy Latinos". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. Retrieved August 25, 2011. 
  11. ^ Espinoza, Ramón (November 2, 2005). "Complete list of 6th annual Latin Grammy nominations". USA Today (Gannett Company). Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  12. ^ "7th Annual Latin Grammy Winners List". Latin Grammy Awards (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2006. Archived from the original on June 4, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Lista completa de nominados al Latin Grammy". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. August 29, 2007. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved February 3, 2011. 
  14. ^ "9th Annual Latin Grammy Awards". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). September 10, 2007. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  15. ^ "2009 Nominados > Rock". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish). Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. 2010. Archived from the original on February 10, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 

External links[edit]