Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album

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Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album
Latin Grammy Awards of 2013
Awarded for vocal or instrumental urban music albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material
Country United States
Presented by Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences
First awarded 2001
Official website latingrammy.com

The Latin Grammy Award for Best Urban Music Album is an honor presented annually at the Latin Grammy Awards, a ceremony that recognizes excellence and promotes a wider awareness of cultural diversity and contributions of Latin recording artists in the United States and internationally.[1] According to the category description guide for the 13th Latin Grammy Awards, the award is for vocal or instrumental merengue house, R&B, reggaeton, rap and/or hip hop music albums containing at least 51 percent playing time of newly recorded material.[2] The award was first presented as the Best Rap/Hip-Hop Album until it received its current name, Best Urban Music Album, at the 5th Latin Grammy Awards ceremony in 2004.[3][4]

The accolade for Best Urban Music Album was first presented to the Argentine band Sindicato Argentino del Hip Hop at the second Latin Grammy Awards in 2001 for their album Un Paso a la Eternidad. In 2009, the Puerto Rican duo Calle 13 became the first urban act to be presented with Best Urban Music Album and Album of the Year for their album Los de Atrás Vienen Conmigo (2008). Calle 13 also hold the record for the most wins, with four. Puerto Rico is the only country with more than one winner, though award-winning albums have also been recorded by musicians originating from Argentina, Cuba and Venezuela. In 2013, Mala Rodríguez became the first female artist and the first Spanish artist to win the award. Puerto Rican rapper Tego Calderón has the most nominations without a win, with three.

Recipients[edit]

A shirtless man in the front holding a microphone, another man with a black vest in the right playing the keyboards, a woman in the left holding a microphone, and a musical ensemble playing several instruments in the back.
Calle 13 are the most successful act in the category, with four wins.
A man with sunglasses and a blue shirt holding a microphone.
2005 winner Daddy Yankee
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Nationality[II] Work Nominees[III] Ref.
2001 Sindicato Argentino del Hip Hop  Argentina Un Paso a la Eternidad
  • DJ Kun — Crazy Atorrante
  • Faces Do Subúrbio — Como É Triste de Olhar
  • Planet Hemp — A Invasão do Sagaz Homem Fumaça
  • 7 Notas 7 Colores —La Mami Internacional Presenta: 7 Notas 7 Colores
[5]
2002 Vico C  Puerto Rico Vivo
  • Camorra — Vírus
  • Nilo MC — Guajiro Del Asfalto
  • Nocaute — CD Pirata
  • X Alfonso — X – Moré
[6]
2003 Orishas  Cuba Emigrante [3]
2004 Vico C  Puerto Rico En Honor A La Verdad [4]
2005 Daddy Yankee  Puerto Rico Barrio Fino [7]
2006 Calle 13  Puerto Rico Calle 13 [8]
2007 Calle 13  Puerto Rico Residente o Visitante [9]
2008 Wisin & Yandel  Puerto Rico Los Extraterrestres [10]
2009 Calle 13  Puerto Rico Los de Atrás Vienen Conmigo [11]
2010 Chino & Nacho  Venezuela Mi Niña Bonita [12]
2011 Calle 13  Puerto Rico Entren Los Que Quieran [13]
2012 Don Omar  Puerto Rico Don Omar Presents MTO²: New Generation [14]
2013 Mala Rodríguez  Spain Bruja

Notes[edit]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Latin Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] The nationality of the performing artist(s).
^[III] The name of the performer and the nominated album

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sobre La Academia Latina de la Grabación". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved July 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Category Guide". Latin Grammy Awards (United States: Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "The nominees are ...". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). July 23, 2003. Retrieved August 25, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b "Lista de nominados al los Grammy Latinos". Terra Networks (in Spanish). Telefónica. Retrieved August 25, 2011. 
  5. ^ "The Full List of Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). July 18, 2001. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  6. ^ "3rd Annual Latin Grammy Awards – Winners". Latin Grammy Awards. Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. September 18, 2002. Archived from the original on December 1, 2002. Retrieved December 1, 2012. 
  7. ^ Espinoza, Ramón (November 2, 2005). "Complete list of 6th annual Latin Grammy nominations". USA Today (Gannett Company). Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ "7th Annual Latin Grammy Winners List". Latin Grammy Awards (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2006. Archived from the original on June 4, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Lista completa de nominados al Latin Grammy". Terra Networks (in Spanish) (Telefónica). August 29, 2007. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved February 3, 2011. 
  10. ^ "9th Annual Latin Grammy Awards". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). September 10, 2007. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 
  11. ^ "2009 Nominados > Urbana". Latin Grammy Awards (in Spanish) (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2010. Archived from the original on February 10, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  12. ^ "7th Annual Latin Grammy Winners List". Latin Grammy Awards (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2010. Archived from the original on November 26, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Latin Grammys: The complete list of nominees". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. November 10, 2011. Archived from the original on October 6, 2012. Retrieved October 5, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Urban". Latin Grammy Awards (Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences). 2012. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved July 28, 2013. 

External links[edit]