Latin pop

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Latin pop (Pop Latino, in Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese; Pop Latine in French) generally refers to pop music that has what may be perceived a Latin influence. Geographically, it could refer to pop music from Latin America or Latin Europe (Spain, Italy, France, Portugal, Romania). Latin pop music is usually sung in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian or other Romance languages, although English and other languages are not uncommon. In addition, many international artists from France and Italy often sing in Spanish for Spanish language audiences. Major Latin pop songwriters include Selena, Leonel García, Gian Marco, Estefano, Kike Santander, Juan Luis Guerra, Mario Domm, Rudy Pérez, and Draco Rosa.[1][2][3][4][5]

Latin pop is a popular style and there are several artists and groups who perform in the genre. Notable ones include Thalía, Lynda Thomas, Luis Fonsi, Timbiriche, Jon Secada, Julio Iglesias, Gloria Estefan, Jennifer Lopez, Shakira, Ricky Martin, Enrique Iglesias, Pitbull, Paulina Rubio, Selena, Luis Miguel, Rocío Dúrcal, José José, Juanes, Belinda, Alejandro Sanz, Eros Ramazzotti, Laura Pausini, Dulce María, Gloria Trevi, Fonseca, Vitaly Novich, José Feliciano and teen idol group Menudo.

History[edit]

Latin Pop is one of the most popular Latin music genres today. However, before the arrival of artists like Shakira and Ricky Martin, Latin Pop first reached a global audience through the work of bandleader Sergio Mendes in the mid-1960s;[6] in later decades, was defined by the romantic music that legendary artists such as Julio Iglesias and Roberto Carlos produced back in the 1970s.[7] Tejano pop star Selena's album Dreaming of You actually debuted at number one on the album charts.

Influences and development[edit]

Latin Pop became the most popular form of Latin music in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s, even achieving massive crossover success among non-Latino listeners during the late 1990s. While not restricted to America by any means, Latin pop was profoundly affected by production techniques and other styles of music—both Latin and otherwise—that originated primarily in the United States. Tejano music, centered in Texas and the U.S./Mexico border region, had begun to introduce synthesizers, slicker production, and a more urban sensibility to formerly rootsy styles like norteño and conjunto. Moreover, New York and Miami were home to thriving Latin club scenes, which during the 1980s led to the rise of Latin freestyle, a club-oriented dance music that was rooted in Latin rhythms but relied on synthesizers and drum machines for most of its arrangements. Both of these sounds influenced the rise of Latin pop, which retained Latin rhythms in its uptempo numbers but relied more on mainstream pop for its melodic sense. Latin pop's first major crossover star was Gloria Estefan, who scored a succession of non-club-oriented dance-pop hits during the mid- to late 1980s, but who eventually became known more as an adult contemporary diva with an affinity for sweeping ballads. This blend of Latinized dance-pop and adult contemporary balladeering dominated Latin pop through the 1990s; most of its artists sang in Spanish for Latino audiences, although Latin pop's similarity to the mainstream helped several performers score crossover hits when they chose to record in English. Jon Secada landed several pop hits during the mid-1990s, and Tejano pop star Selena's album Dreaming of You actually debuted posthumously at number one on the album charts upon its 1995 release.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0261555/
  2. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0763362/
  3. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0787680/
  4. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1257075/
  5. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0740875/
  6. ^ Latin Pop, Rhapsody , retrieved 8 January 2013.
  7. ^ Latin Pop, About- Latin music , retrieved 8 January 2013.
  8. ^ Latin Pop, Allmusic, retrieved 8 January 2013.

External links[edit]