Latinidad

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Latinidad, a scholarly invention, was first introduced by sociologist Felix Padilla. It is more of a construct than biological reality. Latinidad is the study of other nationality groups whose countries of origin are the Spanish-speaking countries of Central America, the Caribbean, and South America.[1] Cultural anthropologist Arlene Davila describes this notion of Latinidad as the “out-of-many, one-people' process through which 'Latinos' or 'Hispanics' are conceived and represented as sharing one common identity”.[2] Yet Latinidad is not only the process of a shared common identity but also invokes pan-Latino/a solidarity. Latinidad is contingent and a cultural event based on place-specific social relations.[3]

Latinidad in education[edit]

Latinidad in education has brought many groups together. The start of Latinidad in education could be dated back to the 1960s with the Chicano Movement, in which about 15,000 Chicano students, from Mexican descent, walked out of class to protest the discrimination they experienced in their education. Some of the discrimination that they suffered were; no speaking in Spanish in class, low admission of Chicano students into colleges, and the lack of Latino administration. The students felt that the teachers of the schools were mostly Anglo-American, which undermined the abilities of the students because of many stereotypes with which the Mexican community had been characterized, like; they don’t care about education and that they are lazy. In this case the students joined together to show the administration that these stereotypes needed to end, and they stood up and showed the administration that they were not lazy and cared about their education.

Another movement in education by Latinidad was brought by the Puerto Rican walkout in February 1964 in New York City. In this walkout more than 400,000 students from Puerto Rican descent went to the street and demanded integrated and quality education (Buder, 1964, p. 1). In this movement not only Puerto Ricans, but also African Americans joined the cause since they were also tired of the discrimination that both groups had been suffering in the education system of New York City. In this movement the community was also involved to show support to these students, since many of the community were also being discriminated against in their jobs, and knew that by joining the cause of their children, it was part of their own cause as well. In this case the integration of another group was an important step for Latinidad, which is the integration of different groups and not just one group. Also the support of the community brought much exposure to what these groups were experiencing.

These movements have brought demand to the people in the upper sector of education to provide ethnic studies to these groups. With these movements Chicano Studies, Puerto Rican Studies and Latino Studies had been offered in colleges now. Latino Studies is just a part of Latinidad since the integration of all of the groups from Latin America has been integrated in studies like; Cubans, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Caribbean, Brazilians and Central Americans. All these accomplishments were implemented in the 1980s when Latino Studies was introduced in education. “Each Latino group is distinct in its own ways, but it is also part of the larger historical, political, and cultural processes affecting all racialized minority groups in the country. (San Miguel 10)”

Latinidad in literature[edit]

Chick lit is genre fiction which addresses issues of modern womanhood, often humorously and lightheartedly. In 2003 Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez published her first novel, The Dirty Girls Social Club, where she explores the underlying tensions, conflicts, and contradictions inherent in the social construction of Latinidad. In both of her novels, The Dirty Girls Social Club (2003) and Playing with Boys, Valdes-Rodriguez keys in on both race and social class and the ways in which the two are inextricably linked. She tries to render her Latinas and Latinidad palatable to mainstream consumers. In addition, she notes Latinidad in polka-based norteno and banda sounds and increasingly reggaeton Puerto Rican artists such as Wisin y Yandel, Tego Calderon, etc., including salsa-based Afro-Caribbean that induce connotations of sensuality and romance.

Latinidad and culture[edit]

Latinidad invokes pan-Latino/a solidarity that among Latinos/as is materialized in ways that illuminate an understanding of identity, place, and belonging. 'We're all one heart here. There are no distinctions of race, of country, or culture'.[4] This so-called Latinization of the U.S. has the potential to profoundly reshape the parameters of democracy, citizenship, and national identity. Culture involves a dynamic interplay between flow and pause. In this sense, flows and pauses, and the dynamic tension between these two polarities, can be seen to be at the heart of Latinidad as cultural coherence. Latinidad ranges from the very local scale of the individual and his or her immediate zone of inhabitance—a block, a neighborhood, a street—to nations and world regions that are hemispheric in scale.[5] It is place specific; both shaped, and is shaped by, the city itself. Latinidad has important ramifications for national, transnational, hemispheric, and even global, modalities of belonging. According to Price (2007) this flexible coalescence of identity around a variously imagined Latinidad provides fertile conceptual and empirical terrain for understanding how culture coalesces at the scale of quotidian human encounters.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miguel, Guadalupe San. "Embracing Latinidad: Beyond Nationalism in the History of Education." Journal of Latinos & Education 10.1 (2011): 3-22.
  2. ^ Morrison, Amanda Maria. "Chicanas and “Chick Lit”: Contested Latinidad in the Novels of Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez." Journal of Popular Culture 43.2 (2010): 309–329.
  3. ^ Price, Patricia L. "Cohering Culture on Calle Ocho: The Pause and Flow of Latinidad." Globalizations 4.1 (2007): 81-99.
  4. ^ Price, Patricia L. "Cohering Culture on Calle Ocho: The Pause and Flow of Latinidad." Globalizations 4.1 (2007): 81–99.
  5. ^ Price, Patricia L. "Cohering Culture on Calle Ocho: The Pause and Flow of Latinidad." Globalizations 4.1 (2007): 81–99.
  1. Miguel, Guadalupe San. "Embracing Latinidad: Beyond Nationalism in the History of Education." Journal of Latinos & Education 10.1 (2011): 3-22.
  2. Morrison, Amanda Maria. "Chicanas and “Chick Lit”: Contested Latinidad in the Novels of Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez." Journal of Popular Culture 43.2 (2010): 309–329.
  3. Price, Patricia L. "Cohering Culture on Calle Ocho: The Pause and Flow of Latinidad." Globalizations 4.1 (2007): 81–99.
  4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chick_lit