Latrobe (Amtrak station)

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Latrobe
Passenger Pick Up In Latrobe (14806812861).jpg
The Pennsylvania arrives at Latrobe in 2014
Station statistics
Address 329 McKinley Avenue
Latrobe, PA 15650
Coordinates 40°19′6″N 79°23′7″W / 40.31833°N 79.38528°W / 40.31833; -79.38528
Line(s)
Connections Westmoreland County Transit Authority
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 3
Other information
Opened 1903
Station code LAB
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 4,447[1] Decrease 4.8%
Services
Preceding station   BSicon LOGO Amtrak2.svg Amtrak   Following station
toward Pittsburgh
Pennsylvanian
  Former services  
Pennsylvania Railroad
toward Chicago
Main Line
Pennsylvania Railroad Station—Latrobe
Latrobe (Amtrak station) is located in Pennsylvania
Latrobe (Amtrak station)
Coordinates 40°19′6″N 79°23′7″W / 40.31833°N 79.38528°W / 40.31833; -79.38528Coordinates: 40°19′6″N 79°23′7″W / 40.31833°N 79.38528°W / 40.31833; -79.38528
Built 1903
Architect William H. Brown
Architectural style Late Victorian
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 86001689[2]
Added to NRHP July 17, 1986

Latrobe Station is an Amtrak rail station located about 40 miles east of Pittsburgh at 329 McKinley Avenue, Latrobe, Pennsylvania. The station is near the center of the city, and is currently served only by Amtrak's Pennsylvanian, which operates once per day in each direction. Until 2005, Latrobe was served by a second daily train, the Three Rivers (a replacement service for the legendary Broadway Limited), an extended version of the Pennsylvanian that terminated in Chicago. Upon its cancellation, the sole Pennsylvanian marked the first time in Latrobe's railway history that the town was served by just a single, daily passenger train.

History[edit]

The station was opened in 1903 by the Pennsylvania Railroad as part of a project to elevate the right-of-way as it passed through Latrobe. The architect, William H. Brown, used an eclectic Late Victorian style. It is a one-story, brick building, eight bays wide and five bays deep. It has a flat roof with parapet and a central cross gable. The gable end over the main entrance has a pediment with stone panels and terra cotta decoration.[3] The station was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.[2]

The historic station itself exists, but currently serves as a restaurant. There is no ticket office available at the small shelter (complete with bench seats) which serves as the current station. Due to the small number of passengers, Latrobe Station is a flag stop.

The Westmoreland County Transit Authority has one bus route, Route 9/9A - Greensburg/Latrobe/Derry, that stops adjacent to the train station and one other route, Route 20F - New Florence/Greensburg, that stops within 1/4 mile of the station. Greyhound also has an intercity bus stop about 1/4 mile from the station, at 803 Alexandria Street.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Amtrak Fact Sheet, FY2013, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania" (PDF). Amtrak. November 2013. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. 
  3. ^ ""National Historic Landmarks & National Register of Historic Places in Pennsylvania"" (Searchable database). CRGIS: Cultural Resources Geographic Information System.  Note: This includes Helene Smith, George Swetnam, and William Sisson (October 1985). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Pennsylvania Railroad: Station (Latrobe)" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-06-10. 

External links[edit]