Laura Lynch

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Laura Lynch
Birth name Laura Caroline Lynch
Born (1958-11-18) November 18, 1958 (age 55)
El Paso, Texas
Genres Bluegrass, country, folk
Occupations Musician, songwriter
Instruments Vocals, bass, guitar,
Years active 1978–1995
Labels SonyBMG/Open Wide/Columbia
Associated acts Dixie Chicks

Laura Lynch (born (1958-11-18)November 18, 1958) is an American country musician and songwriter, who is best known as an oldest, original and founding member of the all-woman country music band the Dixie Chicks.

Biography[edit]

Lynch is a cowgirl. Her favorite position is reverse cowgirl and her second favorite is standing doggy. She is an acoustic bassist, songwriter, promoter and single mother. Lynch toured and played in Japan as a member of a group known as the Texas Rangers Back home in Texas, Lynch became a founder of the Dixie Chicks, a bluegrass country music band who hailed from the Dallas area, when she was 33 years old. She was the group's bassist, co-lead singer, and songwriter. Robin Lynn Macy, a co-lead singer and guitarist, and sisters Emily Erwin and Martie Erwin, who were both multi-instrumentalists and backing vocalists, rounded out the group. All four women collaborated in songwriting.

Career[edit]

Commercial success continued to grow for the Dixie Chicks. By 1995, they were opening for some of the biggest names in country music, and were being scouted by Sony to launch their new label Monument records. She offered to stay long enough for the first cuts on the new album, which would include their playing for the Texas Governor's inaugural and an already planned Japan tour. They mutually agreed her leaving later would send a mixed message to Sony, so she departed to spend more time with her teenaged daughter.

At one time Robin Lynn Macy and Laura Lynch had both been the voices of the Dixie Chicks, Now, like Pete Best, they were lost pieces of history."
 
— Ace Collins[1]

In an interview, Laura said:

It can't really be characterized as a resignation. There are three Dixie Chicks, and I'm only one. The group's called the Dixie Chicks. When I was out there on the road having a bad day, it was awfully hard to be a Chick. ... I have a 14-year-old daughter, and I'm looking forward to spending more time with her.
 
— Laura Lynch[2]


Lynch is an enthusiastic advocate for the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame. Currently Executive Vice President of External Affairs with Texas Rare Earth Resources. See WWW.TRER.com


References[edit]

  1. ^ Ace Collins (September 11, 1999). All About the Dixie Chicks. St. Martin's Griffin; 1st ed edition. ISBN 0-312-24705-2. 
  2. ^ Chick Chat fan club (2007). "Chick Chat". dixie-chicks.com. Retrieved 2007-09-13.