Laura of Euthymius

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Coordinates: 31°49′00.40″N 35°21′31.50″E / 31.8167778°N 35.3587500°E / 31.8167778; 35.3587500

Laura of Euthymius is located in the Palestinian territories
Laura of Euthymius
Laura of Euthymius
Location in West Bank
Icon of St. Euthymius
The Good Samaritan Inn (Khan al-Ahmar)

The Laura of Euthymius was a laura in Palestine founded by Saint Euthymius the Great in 420.

The lavra, a cluster of cells for hermits around a church, was located in Adummim on the road from Jericho to Jerusalem and was based on the layout of the Pharan lavra, with small cells.[1] Its church was dedicated by Juvenal, Bishop of Jerusalem on 7 May 428.[2] Following the death of Euthymius on 20 January 473 the church was converted to a refectory and a new church and ceonobium were built above it.[3] The ceonobium was the area that novitiate monks would receive training prior to admittance to a lavra of the Saba tradition.[4] The new church was consecrated by Martyrius, Patriarch of Jerusalem, in 482 and the site thereafter became known as the Monastery of St. Euthymius.[5]

The site was abandoned in the 12th century. In the 13th century, it was converted into a travellers' inn, Khan al-Ahmar, a caravanserai for pilgrims on the route between Jerusalem and Mecca via Nabi Musa.[3] The site is east of Mishor Adumim, the industrial zone of Ma'ale Adumim.

The Laura at Euthymius was essential in the advancement and organisation of the sabaite (desert monastic) movement,[4] and was central to the development of the non-Chalcedonian orthodoxy and miaphysism within Palestinian monasticism and Oriental Orthodoxy of the Eastern Orthodox Church.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patrich Joseph (2001) The Sabaite Heritage in the Orthodox Church from the Fifth Century to the Present Peeters Publishers, ISBN 90-429-0976-5 p 342
  2. ^ Denys Pringle (1998). The Churches of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem: L-Z (excluding Tyre). Cambridge University Press. p. 229. 
  3. ^ a b Murphy-O'Connor, Jerome (2008) The Holy Land: An Oxford Archaeological Guide from Earliest Times to 1700 Oxford University Press US, ISBN 0-19-923666-6 p 335
  4. ^ a b Patrich, Joseph (1995) Sabas, Leader of Palestinian Monasticism: A Comparative Study in Eastern Monasticism, Fourth to Seventh Centuries Dumbarton Oaks, ISBN 0-88402-221-8 pp 265-266
  5. ^ Denys Pringle. Op. Cit.. p. 230. 
  6. ^ Patrich, Joseph (2001) The Sabaite Heritage in the Orthodox Church from the Fifth Century to the Present Peeters Publishers, ISBN 90-429-0976-5 p 289