Laurell K. Hamilton

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Laurell Kaye Hamilton
Born Laurell Kaye Klein
(1963-02-19) February 19, 1963 (age 51)
Heber Springs, Arkansas, US
Pen name Laurell K. Hamilton
Occupation Writer, Novelist
Nationality American
Period 1993–present
Genres Fantasy, Erotica, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction
Notable work(s) Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter
Merry Gentry series

www.laurellkhamilton.org

Laurell Kaye Hamilton (born February 19, 1963) is an American fantasy and romance writer.[1] She is best known as the author of two series of stories.

Her New York Times-bestselling Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series centers on Anita Blake, a professional zombie raiser, vampire executioner and supernatural consultant for the police, which includes novels, short story collections, and comic books. Six million copies of Anita Blake novels are in print.[2] Her Merry Gentry series centers on Meredith Gentry, Princess of the Unseelie court of Faerie, a private detective facing repeated assassination attempts.

Both fantasy series follow their protagonists as they gain in power and deal with the dangerous "realities" of worlds in which creatures of legend live.

Personal life[edit]

Laurell Kaye Hamilton was born Laurell Kaye Klein in Heber Springs, Arkansas but grew up in Sims, Indiana with her grandmother Laura Gentry.[3] Her education includes degrees in English and biology from Marion College (now called Indiana Wesleyan University), a private Evangelical Christian liberal arts college in Marion, Indiana that is affiliated with the Wesleyan Church denomination. She met Gary Hamilton, whom she married, there. They have one daughter together, Trinity.[4]

Hamilton is involved with a number of animal charities, particularly supporting dog rescue efforts and wolf preservation.[5]

Hamilton currently lives in St. Louis County, Missouri,[6] with husband Jonathon Green and daughter Trinity.

Works[edit]

Laurell K. Hamilton is the author of two major book series, spin-off comic books, various anthologies, and other stand-alone titles:

  • Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter is an animator and necromancer who raises the dead for a living. She is also a vampire executioner and in later books a U.S. Marshal. Blake lives in a fictional St. Louis where vampires and were animals exist and recently gained some rights as citizens. As of November 2013, Hamilton has published 22 novels and 5 novellas in the Anita Blake series. As of 2009 more than 6 million copies of Anita Blake novels have been printed and several have become New York Times bestsellers.[2][7]
  • Anita Blake comics are the comic book renditions of the Anita Blake series. As of May, 2012, the comic book series has included her first three books, Guilty Pleasures, Laughing Corpse and Circus of the Damned. There was also a special prologue type of comic issued named, "The First Death".
  • Merry Gentry is a Princess of Faerie and a private investigator. She is constantly dodging assassination attempts while juggling life in the "real world" where everyone knows faeries exist. As of November 2013, there have been a total of eight novels in the Merry Gentry series. The ninth Merry Gentry novel is scheduled for publication on June 3rd, 2014.

Reception[edit]

Anita Blake[edit]

Reader reaction to the series's shift in tone from crime noir thriller to focus more predominantly on the sexual themes in the series has been mixed, starting with Narcissus in Chains when the main character of Anita Blake becomes infected with the ardeur. The ardeur is a supernatural power inadvertently given to Anita by her vampire Master Jean-Claude that gives her massive amounts of power but also demands that she have sexual intercourse with several different people through the course of a day, sometimes in large groups. Reception to these dynamics and to the usage of sexual abuse in later books has been mixed,[3] with some reviewers commenting that the character of Anita spent too much time "obsessing about whether or not she’s a slut" while others remarked that the erotic themes enhanced the series.[8] In response to these comments, Hamilton issued a blog entitled "Dear Negative Reader" where she addressed a growing number of readers on the Internet that were expressing disappointment in the series's changes.[3][9] In the blog Hamilton told the readers that "life is too short to read books you don’t like" and that if they found that the current subject matter pushed "you past that comfortable envelope of the mundane" then "stop reading" and speculated that some of the readers were either "closet readers" or comment based on others' opinions.[3][9] The blog entry was negatively received by some readers.[3]

Critical reviewers have also commented on the amount of sex in later books, as in a 2006 review in The Boston Globe of Micah. The review was largely negative, stating "we were not impressed. Hamilton no doubt appeals to romance and erotica lovers, but it does not take long for the clichés and the constant droning about sex to become tiresome."[10] Other reviewers for The Kansas City Star and Publishers Weekly also commented on the rise in sexual themes in the series.[11] The reviewer for the Kansas City Star stated that "After 13 erotically charged books, boredom has reared its ugly head for the 14th novel in Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake series, as eroticism becomes mere description..." and Publishers Weekly commented that Blood Noir had a "growing air of ennui, which longtime readers can't help sharing as sex increasingly takes the place of plot and character development".[12]

In contrast, a Denver Post review of Danse Macabre took a more positive view of the eroticism in Hamilton's work. Although it noted that "[t]hose looking for mystery and mayhem on this Anita adventure are out of luck" it also stated that "the main attraction of the Anita Blake novels in the past five years has been their erotic novelty", and "[f]ew, if any, mainstream novels delve so deeply into pure, unadulterated erotica".[13]

Bibliography[edit]

Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter[edit]

  1. Guilty Pleasures (1993) ISBN 0-515-13449-X
  2. The Laughing Corpse (1994) ISBN 0-425-19200-8
  3. Circus of the Damned (1995) ISBN 0-515-13448-1
  4. The Lunatic Cafe (1996) ISBN 0-425-20137-6
  5. Bloody Bones (1996) ISBN 0-425-20567-3
  6. The Killing Dance (1997) ISBN 0-425-20906-7
  7. Burnt Offerings (1998) ISBN 0-515-13447-3
  8. Blue Moon (1998) ISBN 0-515-13445-7
  9. Obsidian Butterfly (2000) ISBN 0-515-13450-3
  10. Narcissus in Chains (2001) ISBN 5-558-61270-3
  11. Cerulean Sins (2003) ISBN 0-515-13681-6
  12. Incubus Dreams (2004) ISBN 0-515-13975-0
  13. Micah (2006) ISBN 0-515-14087-2 (novella)
  14. Danse Macabre (2006) ISBN 0-425-20797-8
  15. The Harlequin (2007) ISBN 978-0-425-21724-5
  16. Blood Noir (2008) ISBN 978-0-425-22219-5
  17. Skin Trade (2009) ISBN 978-0-425-22772-5
  18. Flirt (February 2010) ISBN 978-0-425-23567-6 (novella)
  19. Bullet (June 2010) ISBN 978-0-425-23433-4
  20. Hit List (June 2011) ISBN 978-0-425-24113-4
  21. Beauty (May 2012) ISBN 978-1-101-57930-5 (novella)
  22. Kiss the Dead (June 2012) ISBN 978-0-425-24754-9
  23. Affliction (July 2013) ISBN 978-0-425-25570-4
  24. Dancing (September 2013) ISBN 978-0-698-15643-2 (novella)
  25. "Shutdown" (short story; unofficially and temporarily released October 2013, not yet formally published)[14]
Science Fiction Book Club omnibus editions
  1. Club Vampyre (Guilty Pleasures, The Laughing Corpse, and Circus of the Damned)
  2. Midnight Cafe (The Lunatic Cafe, Bloody Bones, and The Killing Dance)
  3. Black Moon Inn (Burnt Offerings and Blue Moon)
  4. Nightshade Tavern (Obsidian Butterfly and Narcissus in Chains)
  5. Out of This World (first 100 pages of Narcissus in Chains)

Merry Gentry series[edit]

  1. A Kiss of Shadows (2000) ISBN 978-0-345-42340-5
  2. A Caress of Twilight (2002) ISBN 978-0-345-47816-0
  3. Seduced by Moonlight (2004) ISBN 978-0-345-44359-5
  4. A Stroke of Midnight (2005) ISBN 978-0-345-44360-1
  5. Mistral's Kiss (2006) ISBN 978-0-345-44361-8
  6. A Lick of Frost (2007) ISBN 978-0-345-49591-4
  7. Swallowing Darkness (2008) ISBN 978-0-345-49593-8
  8. Divine Misdemeanors (2009) ISBN 978-0-345-49596-9
  9. A Shiver of Light (June 4, 2014)

Marvel Comics series[edit]

(in Anita's chronological order)

  1. Laurell K. Hamilton's Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter: The First Death 1–2 (7 & 12/2007)
  2. Guilty Pleasures Handbook (2007)
  3. Anita Blake Vampire Hunter: Guilty Pleasures 1–12 (12/2006 – 8/2008)
  4. Anita Blake: The Laughing Corpse – Animator 1–5 (10/2008 – 2/2009)
  5. Anita Blake: The Laughing Corpse – Necromancer 1–5 (4/2009 – 9/2009)
  6. Anita Blake: The Laughing Corpse – Executioner 1–5 (9/2009 – 3/2010)
  7. Anita Blake: Circus of The Damned – The Charmer 1–5 (5/2010 – 10/2010)
  8. Anita Blake: Circus of The Damned – The Ingenue 1–5 (1/2011–ongoing)
  9. Anita Blake: Circus of the Damned – The Scoundrel 1–5 (Ongoing)

Others[edit]

  • Nightseer (1992)
  • Nightshade (1992) (Star Trek: The Next Generation authorized novel #24)
  • Death of a Darklord[6] (1995) (TSR's Ravenloft series)
  • "A Clean Sweep" (first story in Superheroes, a 1995 anthology)
  • Cravings (anthology, 2004)
  • Bite (anthology, 2004)
  • Strange Candy (14 published and unpublished short stories, released November 2006)
  • Never After (anthology, 2009)
  • Ardeur: 14 Writers on the Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter Series Pub. Date: April 2010

References[edit]

  1. ^ McCune, Alisa. "A Conversation With Laurell K. Hamilton". SF Site. Retrieved 17 August 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Works by Laurell K Hamilton". Retrieved 6 October 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Benefiel, Candace (2006). Reading Laurell K. Hamilton. Libraries Unlimited. p. 110. ISBN 0313378355. 
  4. ^ "Locus Online: Laurell K. Hamilton interview (excerpts)". Locus. September 2000. 
  5. ^ "Laurell K. Hamilton Interview, Horror Author". Flames Rising. Retrieved 30 October 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "Laurell K. Hamilton". Archived from the original on Feb 24, 2009. 
  7. ^ "KISS THE DEAD". RT Book Reviews. Retrieved 30 October 2012. 
  8. ^ Amazeen, Sandy. "Book Review: Danse Macabre by Laurell K. Hamilton". Monsters and Critics. Retrieved 30 October 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Dear Negative Reader". Laurell K Hamilton. Retrieved 30 October 2012. 
  10. ^ O'Gorman, Rochelle (2006-03-26). "Beware the Ringing Cell". The Boston Globe. p. C7. ISSN 0743-1791. 
  11. ^ Folsom, Robert (2006-07-17). "'Danse Macabre' by Laurell K. Hamilton; 'The Lies of Locke Lamora' by Scott Lynch". The Kansas City Star. 
  12. ^ Publishers Weekly Fiction Reviews: Week of 2008-04-21 ©2008 Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. Accessed August 26, 2008
  13. ^ Shindler, Dorman T (2006-08-20). "7th Anita Blake novel builds on erotic aura". The Denver Post. p. F13. ISSN 1930-2193. 
  14. ^ Hamilton, Laurell K. (October 8, 2013). "A present from me to you, because our government is behaving badly". laurellkhamilton.org. Retrieved November 14, 2013. 

Other sources[edit]

Literature
  • Gordon, Joan; Hollinger, Veronica, eds. (1997). Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 0-8122-1628-8. 
  • Lennard, John (2010). "Of Sex and Faerie: Meredith Gentry's Improbable Code of Orgasm and Other Paranormal Romance". In Lennard, John. Of Sex and Faerie: Further essays on Genre Fiction. Tirril: Humanities-Ebooks. pp. 112–164. ISBN 978-1-84760-171-1. 
  • Benefiel, Candace, ed. (2011). Reading Laurell K. Hamilton. Colorado: Libraries Unlimited. ISBN 0-3133-7835-5. 
Interviews

External links[edit]

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