Laurie Roth

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Laurie Roth
Nationality  United States
Occupation Radio talk show host
Agent Imagine Publicity
Website
http://therothshow.com/

Laurie Roth is an American radio talk show host and political commentator. She hosts the nationally syndicated political talk show, The Roth Show. As a candidate for President of the United States in the 2012 election, she unsuccessfully sought the 2012 nominations of the Constitution Party and the American Independent Party.

Education and early career[edit]

Roth earned a Ph.D. in counseling with an emphasis on alcohol and drugs from Oregon State University.[1] She was a singer-songwriter in the early to mid-1990s and host and co-producer of the PBS music show "CD Highway" from 1995 to 2000.[1]

Talk radio career[edit]

Roth began her career in talk radio as a guest on KGA-AM in Spokane, Washington in 2001.[1] She then had her own show on KPLS in Los Angeles, California.[1]

The Roth Show[edit]

The self-described "Annie Oakley of the Airwaves,"[1] has hosted the nationally syndicated The Roth Show, a conservative political commentary program, since 2003 on KQNT in Spokane.[1] The program is broadcast weekdays from the studios of flagship station KSBN in Spokane to over 50 stations nationwide.[2][3]

Traffic accident[edit]

In August 2005, Roth was critically injured in a motorcycle crash,[4][5] from which she suffered multiple broken bones and other bodily injuries, and was in a coma for two weeks. As a result of her injuries, she was unable to host her radio program for nearly a year. She returned as host of The Roth Show in June 2006.[2][6]

Political activity[edit]

Roth is a political columnist for the Internet publications News With Views, Canada Free Press and the New Media Journal.[7]

Presidential campaign[edit]

In mid-2011, Roth confirmed that she was exploring the possibility of running for President of the United States.[8] She announced her candidacy for the presidential nomination of the American Independent Party in November 2011.[9][10] She also ran for the presidential nomination of the Constitution Party,[11][12] which was won by former U.S. Congressman Virgil Goode on the first ballot at the 2012 Constitution Party National Convention.[13] Roth finished fifth in the balloting with 1.49% of the vote. Following her defeat for that party's nomination, Roth continued her candidacy for the American Independent Party nomination and contemplated the possibility of continuing her presidential bid as a "tea party" independent candidate.[14]

Roth announced that she had dropped out of the 2012 presidential race on July 25, 2012.[15]

Plaintiff in lawsuits against President Obama[edit]

In January 2012, Roth was named as a plaintiff in a lawsuit against President Barack Obama in Georgia,[16] and was represented by birther movement activist Orly Taitz.[17] Roth and her fellow plaintiffs challenged President Obama's eligibility to run for president of the United States. On February 3, 2012, Judge Michael Malihi ruled in favor of President Obama.[17] Roth and her fellow plaintiffs appealed Judge Malihi's ruling; their appeal was denied on March 2, 2012.[18]

In April 2012, Roth was added as a plaintiff to an election challenge against the President in Mississippi.[19] While listed on legal motions for the Mississippi election challenge, it was unknown if Roth was an official plaintiff as no motion requesting Roth's addition as a plaintiff was noted on the case docket.

Personal life[edit]

Roth lives with her husband and two children in Elk, Washington.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Laurie Roth Show' lands on KQNT". The Spokesman-Review via HighBeam Research (subscription required). April 23, 2003. Retrieved May 15, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b McLeod, Judi (July 07, 2008) "Radio’s Laurie Roth gives us something to believe in", Canada Free Press. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  3. ^ "Harris Broadcasting adds The Roth Show", Radio Ink, June 07, 2010. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  4. ^ "Radio host Laurie Roth hurt in motorcycle crash", The Seattle Times. August 26, 2005. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  5. ^ "Radio talk show host in critical condition", The Spokesman Review. August 27, 2005. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  6. ^ "Laurie's accident & comeback", www.therothshow.com. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  7. ^ "Welcome to the Roth Show", www.therothshow.com. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  8. ^ Hensley, Nicole (July 12, 2011) "Dr. Laurie Roth Decides to Seriously Explore Running for President", KXLY.com. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  9. ^ Kovacs, Joe (November 04, 2011) "Another Woman jumps into race for president", WorldNetDaily. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  10. ^ "Laurie Roth Makes Independent Run for President, Says AIP Will Put Her On the Ballot", Independent Political Report. December 12, 2011. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  11. ^ "Constitution Party Presidential Debate Involves Six Candidates", Independent Political Report, March 26, 2012. Retrieved April 09, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Camben, Jim (April 20, 2012) "Spokane radio talk show host runs for president", The Seattle Times via The Spokesman-Review. Retrieved May 15, 2012
  13. ^ "Constitution Party Selects Presidential Nominee". C-SPAN. April 21, 2012. Retrieved April 22, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Roth considering independent run for president", The Spokesman-Review. April 24, 2012. Retrieved May 15, 2012.
  15. ^ "National radio talk show host, Laurie Roth drops out of Presidential race – Dives deeper into race for America", www.therothshow.com. Retrieved August 06, 2012.
  16. ^ Who is Presidential Candidate Dr. Laurie Roth, and Why is She Suing Obama? Renew America Retrieved April 14, 2012
  17. ^ a b Georgia Ballot Challenge Ruling Scribd Retrieved April 14, 2012
  18. ^ Georgia Ballot Challenge Appeal Ruling Scribd Retrieved April 14, 2012
  19. ^ Mississippi Election Challenge Interlocutory Appeal "Scribd" Retrieved April 22, 2012

External links[edit]