Laurieston, Falkirk

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 55°59′55″N 3°45′09″W / 55.9986°N 03.7524°W / 55.9986; -03.7524

Laurieston
Scottish Gaelic: Baile Labhrainn
Laurieston looking west.jpg
Looking west towards Falkirk along the A803 through Laurieston
Laurieston is in the centre of the Falkirk council area in the Central Belt of the Scottish mainland.
Laurieston is in the centre of the Falkirk council area in the Central Belt of the Scottish mainland.
Laurieston
 Laurieston shown within the Falkirk council area
Population 2,752 [1] (2001 census)
OS grid reference NS910794
    - Edinburgh  21.8 mi (35.1 km) E 
    - London  344 mi (554 km) SSE 
Council area Falkirk
Lieutenancy area Stirling and Falkirk
Country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town FALKIRK
Postcode district FK2
Dialling code 01324
Police Scottish
Fire Scottish
Ambulance Scottish
EU Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Falkirk
Scottish Parliament Falkirk East
Website falkirk.gov.uk
List of places
UK
Scotland

Laurieston is a village in the Falkirk council area in Central Scotland. It is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) east Falkirk, 1.6 miles (2.6 km) south-west of Grangemouth and 1.6 miles (2.6 km) west of Polmont.

Laurieston is located on the A803 road between Falkirk and Polmont. At the time of the 2001 census, Laurieston had a population of 2,752 residents,[1] down from 3,000 in 1991 and 3,300 in 1971.[1]

The course of the Antonine Wall runs through the village.

History[edit]

Situated on the main street is Hawthorn Cottage, a nineteenth-century stone dwelling that was once owned by Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and creator of the Nobel Prizes after his death. Nobel lived there while managing an explosives factory near the nearby villages of Redding and Westquarter.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Insight 2001 Census, No. 3 - 2001 Census population of wards and settlements www.falkirk.gov.uk. Retrieved 2009-12-09
  2. ^ "Nobel in Scotland". Nobelprize.org, the official website of the Nobel Prize. 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-06. 

External links[edit]