Lawrence A. Cremin

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Lawrence A. Cremin (October 31, 1925 in New York, N.Y. – September 4, 1990 in New York, N.Y.) was an educational historian and administrator.

Biography[edit]

He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1949. He won the 1962 Bancroft Prize in American History for his book The Transformation of the School: Progressivism in American Education, 1876–1957. This book described the anti-intellectual emphasis on non-academic subjects and non-authoritarian teaching methods that occurred as a result of enormously increasing enrollment. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1981 for his American Education: The National Experience, 1783-1876.[1][2]

He was the president of Teachers College, Columbia University, in New York City, from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, he became the president of the Spencer Foundation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Teacher in America, Part I (1988). The Open Mind. 1988. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ Teacher in America, Part II (1988). The Open Mind. 1988. Retrieved February 20, 2012.