Lawrence Lessing

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Not to be confused with Lawrence Lessig.

Lawrence P. Lessing is an award-winning science writer.

A native of Buffalo, New York, he started his career as a newspaper man in Pittsburgh. There he was a correspondent for Time magazine. He was a long-time member of the board of editors of Fortune magazine, where he contributed articles on electronics, jet propulsion, automation, metallurgy.

From 1953 to 1955, he was an editor and contributor to Scientific American. Lessing won the 1965 AAAS-Westinghouse Science Journalism Award for his article in Fortune on the causes of earthquakes.[1] Lessing is the author of three books, Man of High Fidelity: Edwin Howard Armstrong (1956), Understanding Chemistry (1957), and DNA: at the core of life itself (1967). He was for some time on the editorial board of Fortune magazine and was a vigorous opponent of government interference with and distortion of scientific fact (see, for instance, his essay "In Defense of Science",[2] and "Man of High Fidelity").

Lessing's works[edit]

  • Man of High Fidelity: Edwin Howard Armstrong Lawrence Lessing. Lippincott; (1956) ASIN B0007DVUK4
  • Understanding Chemistry. Lawrence Lessing. Interscience Publishers (1957) ISBN 978-0-451-02260-8
  • DNA: At the Core of Life Itself Lawrence P. Lessing. Macmillan Publishing Company (1967) ISBN 978-0-02-571590-5

Honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ AAAS History and archives – Lawrence Lessing
  2. ^ Lessing, Lawrence (8 March 1971). "In Defense of Science". Time.