Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey

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For the municipality of the same name in Cumberland County, see Lawrence Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey.
Lawrence Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lawrence
Lawrence Township highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Lawrence Township highlighted in Mercer County. Inset map: Mercer County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°17′45″N 74°43′12″W / 40.295887°N 74.720093°W / 40.295887; -74.720093Coordinates: 40°17′45″N 74°43′12″W / 40.295887°N 74.720093°W / 40.295887; -74.720093[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Mercer
Formed February 20, 1697 as Maidenhead Township
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Renamed January 24, 1816 as Lawrence Township
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor James S. Kownacki (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Richard S. Krawczun[4]
 • Clerk Kathleen S. Norcia[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 22.063 sq mi (57.143 km2)
 • Land 21.808 sq mi (56.483 km2)
 • Water 0.255 sq mi (0.660 km2)  1.15%
Area rank 124th of 566 in state
4th of 13 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 33,472
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 33,219
 • Rank 68th of 566 in state
4th of 13 in county[12]
 • Density 1,534.8/sq mi (592.6/km2)
 • Density rank 331st of 566 in state
9th of 13 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08648[13]
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402139510[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882126[16][2]
Website http://www.lawrencetwp.com

Lawrence Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 33,472,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 4,313 (+14.8%) from the 29,159 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,372 (+13.1%) from the 25,787 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

Geography[edit]

Lawrence Township is located at 40°17′45″N 74°43′12″W / 40.295887°N 74.720093°W / 40.295887; -74.720093 (40.295887,-74.720093). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 22.063 square miles (57.143 km2), of which, 21.808 square miles (56.483 km2) of it is land and 0.255 square miles (0.660 km2) of it (1.15%) is water.[1][2]

Lawrenceville (with a 2010 Census population of 3,887[18]) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Lawrence Township.[19]

Many area residents often refer to all of Lawrence Township as Lawrenceville, as a significant majority of township residents use a Lawrenceville mailing address as specified by the United States Postal Service, while other residents have mailing addresses in either Princeton or Trenton. The township was notified by the Postal Service in 2007 that the preferred designation for the 08648 would be changed to "Lawrence Township".[20]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 1,032
1810 1,086
1820 1,354 24.7%
1830 1,433 5.8%
1840 1,556 8.6%
1850 1,838 18.1%
1860 2,024 10.1%
1870 2,251 11.2%
1880 3,174 41.0%
1890 1,448 * −54.4%
1900 1,555 7.4%
1910 2,522 62.2%
1920 3,686 46.2%
1930 6,293 70.7%
1940 6,522 3.6%
1950 8,499 30.3%
1960 13,665 60.8%
1970 19,567 43.2%
1980 19,724 0.8%
1990 25,787 30.7%
2000 29,159 13.1%
2010 33,472 14.8%
Est. 2012 33,219 [11] −0.8%
Population sources:
1790-1920[21] 1840[22]
1850-1870[23] 1850[24] 1870[25]
1870[26] 1880-1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[33]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 33,472 people, 12,524 households, and 8,116 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,534.8 per square mile (592.6 /km2). There were 13,239 housing units at an average density of 607.1 per square mile (234.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 69.68% (23,322) White, 10.76% (3,602) Black or African American, 0.20% (66) Native American, 14.10% (4,721) Asian, 0.09% (29) Pacific Islander, 2.73% (913) from other races, and 2.45% (819) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.48% (2,503) of the population.[8]

There were 12,524 households, of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.1% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.07.[8]

In the township, 20.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 13.5% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.3 years. For every 100 females there were 86.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,693 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,442) and the median family income was $108,743 (+/- $4,377). Males had a median income of $68,305 (+/- $6,890) versus $50,103 (+/- $5,345) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,136 (+/- $3,030). About 4.4% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 29,159 people, 10,797 households, and 7,233 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,317.0 people per square mile (508.5/km²). There were 11,180 housing units at an average density of 504.9 per square mile (195.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 79.22% White, 9.28% African American, 0.08% Native American, 7.91% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 1.79% from other races, and 1.60% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.61% of the population.[31][32]

There were 10,797 households out of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.9% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.05.[31][32]

In the township the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 12.4% from 18 to 24, 29.4% from 25 to 44, 23.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 88.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the township was $67,959, and the median income for a family was $82,704. Males had a median income of $56,681 versus $38,468 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,120. About 2.6% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lawrence Township operates under the Faulkner Act (Council-Manager) form of municipal government. The township is governed by a Council consisting of a Mayor and four Council Members who are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve four-year terms on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election every other year.[6] The Mayor is selected by the Council from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting to serve a term of one year.

As of 2012, members of the Lawrence Township Council are Mayor Jim Kownacki, Cathleen Lewis, David Maffei, Michael Powers and Greg Puliti.[35]

Recent mayors of Lawrence Township include:

  • 2003 - Greg Puliti (D)
  • 2004 - Mark Holmes (D)
  • 2005 - Pamela Mount (D)
  • 2006 - Michael Powers (D)
  • 2007 - Greg Puliti (D)
  • 2008 - Mark Holmes (D)
  • 2009 - Pamela Mount (D)
  • 2011 - Greg Puliti (D)

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lawrence Township is located in the 12th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 15th state legislative district.[9][37][38]

New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[42][43]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 15th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Lawrence Township, Mercer County) and in the General Assembly by Reed Gusciora (D, Trenton) and Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[44][45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy.[48] As of 2013, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D; term ends December 31, 2013, Princeton).[49] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the board selects a Freeholder Chair and Vice-Chair from among its members.[50] Mercer County's freeholders are Freeholder Chair John Cimino (D; 2014, Hamilton Township)[51], Freeholder Vice Chair Andrew Koontz (D; 2013, Princeton),[52] Ann M. Cannon (D; 2015, East Windsor Township),[53] Anthony P. Carabelli (D; 2013, Trenton),[54] Pasqual "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (D; 2015, Lawrence Township),[55] Samuel T. Frisby (D; 2015; Trenton)[56] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (D; 2014, Ewing Township)[57][58] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello (D, 2015).[59] Sheriff John A. "Jack" Kemler (D, 2014)[60] and Surrogate Dianne Gerofsky (D, 2016).[61][62]

New Jersey Lottery is headquartered in the One Lawrence Park Complex in Lawrence Township.[63][64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 19,237 registered voters in Lawrence Township, of which 7,718 (40.1%) were registered as Democrats, 3,152 (16.4%) were registered as Republicans and 8,342 (43.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 25 voters registered to other parties.[65]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 66.3% of the vote here (10,025 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 31.6% (4,771 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (177 votes), among the 15,115 ballots cast by the township's 19,981 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.6%.[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 60.1% of the vote here (8,658 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 36.3% (5,228 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (151 votes), among the 14,412 ballots cast by the township's 18,440 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.2.[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 54.7% of the vote here (5,528 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 38.1% (3,858 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.3% (537 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (86 votes), among the 10,113 ballots cast by the township's 19,495 registered voters, yielding a 51.9% turnout.[68]

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

The Lawrence Township Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are four elementary schools — Eldridge Park Elementary (K-3; 253 students) Ben Franklin Elementary (PreK-3; 490) Lawrenceville Elementary (PreK-3; 371) Slackwood Elementary (PreK-3; 258) — Lawrence Intermediate School (4-6; 873), Lawrence Middle School (7-8; 584) and Lawrence High School (9-12; 1,113). Students from Robbinsville Township (known as Washington Township until 2007) had attended Lawrence High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship which ended with the final group of seniors who graduated in the 2006-07 school year.

Lawrence Township is home to two parochial schools operated by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton: Notre Dame High School is a coeducational, Roman Catholic, college preparatory school for students in grades 9-12; and Saint Ann School, which serves 341 students in pre-3 through eighth grade.[70]

Lawrenceville is home to the Lawrenceville School, a coeducational, independent boarding school for grades 9-12, founded in 1810.[71]

Colleges and universities[edit]

Founded in 1865 and granted university status in 1992, Rider University is a private university with its main campus just south of Lawrenceville that serves nearly 6,000 undergraduate and graduate students.[72]

Miscellaneous education[edit]

Lawrence Township is the headquarters location for the Educational Testing Service ("ETS").

The Princeton Community Japanese Language School (PCJLS, プリンストン日本語学校 Purinsuton Nihongo Gakkō) teaches weekend Japanese classes for Japanese citizen children abroad to the standard of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), and it also has classes for people with Japanese as a second language.[73] Courses are taught at Memorial Hall at Rider University.[74] The main office of the school is in Princeton although the office used on Sundays is in Memorial Hall.[73]

History[edit]

What is now Lawrence Township was originally formed as Maidenhead Township on February 20, 1697, while the area was still part of Burlington County in West Jersey. The township was named by the early Quaker settlers after Maidenhead, a Thames River village west of London. It became part of the newly created Hunterdon County on March 11, 1714. Maidenhead Township was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798.[33]

On January 24, 1816, the municipality was renamed Lawrence Township, in honor of Captain James Lawrence — commander of the frigate USS Chesapeake and one of the naval heroes of the War of 1812 — best known for his dying command of "Don't Give up the Ship." Lawrence Township became part of Mercer County at its creation on February 22, 1838. Portions of the township were taken to form Millham Township on February 10, 1882, which was annexed six years later by Trenton.[33]

On September 23, 2003, at approximately 8:25am, an F1 tornado ripped through Lawrence Township. The tornado followed a path along Princeton Pike and caused widespread damage to homes. There were no fatalities.[75][76]

Business and commerce[edit]

Lawrence Township is home to the headquarters of:

Quaker Bridge Mall is a two-level, indoor shopping center located in Lawrenceville on U.S. 1, near Interstate 295. The mall opened in 1975, and has over 100 retail establishments. The mall's anchor stores include J.C. Penney, Lord & Taylor, Macy's, Sears and Old Navy. The mall has a gross leasable area of 1,339,342 square feet (124,428.9 m2).[79] Quaker Bridge Mall also had a renovation in 2011-2012, and was finished around August 2012.

The business district of Lawrenceville is small, but stable. The Lawrence Shopping Center and other businesses along U.S. Route 1 provide additional commercial clusters in the township.

The transmitter for WKXW-FM, better known as New Jersey 101.5, is located near the Quaker Bridge Mall.

Transportation[edit]

View north along Interstate 95 from U.S. Route 206 in Lawrence Township

Two major transportation routes traverse the Township. Part of the Interstate Highway network, Interstate 95 and Interstate 295, describe a semicircle through Lawrence. The Interstate route numbers change at the highway's intersection with U.S. Route 1, the other major highway bisecting the municipality. U.S. 1 is in effect three different roads: the original route from Trenton to New Brunswick in the southern half of the Township, the limited access Trenton Freeway, and the combined road in the northern half that serves as a regional arterial linking the Interstates with New Brunswick and Route 18. U.S. Route 206 is the main artery within the township itself, running from Trenton to Princeton roughly north-to-south. It is a segment of the historic Lincoln Highway, and before that, it was part of the main New York-Philadelphia Post road. Locals refer to it alternately as Route 206 or Lawrence Road. Major county routes that pass through include County Route 533, County Route 546 and County Route 569.

View north along U.S. Route 1 from Interstate 295 in Lawrence Township

Lawrence Township is the site of what has been called the "abrupt ending" of Interstate 95. This resulted from politics in Somerset County that eliminated its planned connection of the Somerset Freeway to Interstate 287. When driving on I-95 north while approaching the interchange for U.S. Route 1, the 95 designation abruptly ends and the highway turns south and becomes Interstate 295. Motorists are then forced to find an alternate route, either by taking US 1 north, or (are directed by signs) to take Interstate 295 south to the Central Jersey Expressway (I-195) east and to the New Jersey Turnpike (the continuation of Interstate 95) at Exit 7A in Robbinsville Township.

The busy Northeast Corridor rail line, carrying Amtrak and New Jersey Transit trains, runs along the eastern edge of the township. The nearest stations are in Hamilton, Trenton, Princeton and Princeton Junction.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to Trenton on the 600, 603, 605, 606, 609 and 613 routes, and local service on route 976.[80]

A rail spur used to run to Lawrenceville from Trenton, but was discontinued in the 1970s and is now a bicycle trail. From Lawrenceville, a trolley line to Princeton existed from 1900 to 1941, but was dismantled before World War II, and the right-of-way largely has reverted to neighboring landowners.[81]

The nearest commercial airport is Trenton-Mercer Airport, formerly known as the Mercer County Airport, in Ewing with nonstop service to 10 major cities in the eastern half of the United States. Lawrence Township is roughly equidistant to the other two nearby commercial airports, Philadelphia International Airport and Newark Liberty International Airport.

Points of interest[edit]

The Port Mercer Canal House is located at 4378 Quakerbridge Road, along the Delaware and Raritan Canal near the border of West Windsor Township and Princeton. The house was built in the 1830s as housing for the bridge tender and his family. The bridge tender was needed to open the swing bridge when canal boats came through, then close it to allow traffic to cross over the canal.

The Delaware and Raritan Canal has an intact walking towpath for most of its length. Additional walking trail areas in the township include Shipetaukin Woods, Carson Road Woods, and part of Rosedale Park. Lawrence Township is part of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail,[82] currently under development.[83]

Jasna Polana was the home of John Seward Johnson I of Johnson & Johnson. His widow converted it into Tournament Players Club at Jasna Polana golf course.

Terhune Orchards, a winery and produce farm.

Colonial Lake, a local man-made lake, centerpiece of the township's Colonial Lake Park.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Lawrence Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Manager, Township of Lawrence. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk, Township of Lawrence. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 73.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Lawrence, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lawrence township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lawrence township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lawrence Township, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  18. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Lawrenceville CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  19. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  20. ^ Lawrence Township Assigned ZIP Code Designation, Lawrence Township, October 31, 2007. Accessed November 19, 2012. "The United States Postal Service (USPS) has notified Lawrence Township Officials that the postal ZIP Code 08648 has been approved for designation as Lawrence Township."
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  22. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 13, 2013. Population for 1840 is listed as 1,156.
  23. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 275, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 13, 2013. "Lawrence, in 1850, contained a population of 1,838; in 1860, 2,024; and in 1870, 2,251. At the village of Lawrenceville, in this township are two superior Seminaries of learning, one for males, conducted by the Rev. Samuel M. Hamel, D.D., and the other for females, by the Rev Charles Nassau, D.D. Millham contained in 1870, 677 inhabitants."
  24. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 139. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 13, 2013.
  26. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 19, 2012. Source lists a total population of 2,254 for the township, including the 677 residents of Millham.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 13, 2012.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed July 12, 2012.
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  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Lawrence township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 13, 2012.
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  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Lawrence township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  35. ^ Town Council, Township of Lawrence. Accessed July 13, 2012.
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  41. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  48. ^ Elected Officials, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ County Executive, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ John Cimino, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Andrew Koontz, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Ann M. Cannon, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Anthony P. Carabelli, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr., Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Samuel T. Frisby, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed August 1, 2011.
  57. ^ Lucylle R. S. Walter, Mercer County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
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  62. ^ Elected Officials for Mercer County, State of New Jersey, revised January 26, 2012. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ Contact Us. New Jersey Lottery. Retrieved on March 23, 2009.
  64. ^ Lawrence township, Mercer County, NJ. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on March 23, 2009.
  65. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Mercer, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 21, 2012.
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  68. ^ 2009 Governor: Mercer County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 21, 2012.
  69. ^ Data for the Lawrence Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 19, 2012.
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