Layering

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This article is about the plant propagation techniques. For other uses, see Layering (disambiguation).
For the use of layering in viticulture, see Propagation of grapevines.
Layering

Layering is a means of plant propagation in which a portion of an aerial stem grows roots while still attached to the parent plant and then detaches as an independent plant. Layering has evolved as a common means of vegetative propagation of numerous species in natural environments. Layering is also utilized by horticulturists to propagate desirable plants.

Natural layering typically occurs when a branch touches the ground, whereupon it produces adventitious roots. At a later stage the connection with the parent plant is severed and a new plant is produced as a result.

The horticultural layering process typically involves wounding the target region to expose the inner stem and optionally applying rooting compounds. In ground layering, the stem is bent down and the target region buried in the soil. This is done in plant nurseries in imitation of natural layering by many plants such as brambles which bow over and touch the tip on the ground, at which point it grows roots and, when separated, can continue as a separate plant. In either case, the rooting process may take from several weeks to a year.

Layering is more complicated than taking cuttings, but has the advantage that the propagated portion continues to receive water and nutrients from the parent plant while it is forming roots. This is important for plants that form roots slowly, or for propagating large pieces. Layering is used quite frequently in the propagation of bonsai; it is also used as a technique for both creating new roots and improving existing roots.

Ground layering[edit]

Ground layering or mound layering is the typical propagation technique for the popular Malling-Merton series of clonal apple rootstocks, in which the original plants are set in the ground with the stem nearly horizontal, which forces side buds to grow upward[citation needed]. After these are started, the original stem is buried up to some distance from the tip. At the end of the growing season, the side branches will have rooted, and can be separated while the plant is dormant. Some of these will be used for grafting rootstocks, and some can be reused in the nursery for the next growing season's crop.

Ground layering is used in the formation of visible surface roots, known as "nebari", on bonsai trees in cases where they have existing unattractive or one-sided roots.

Air layering[edit]

Air layering of Limonium dendroides

In air layering (or marcotting), the target region is wounded, or a strip of bark is removed and then encased in a moisture-retaining medium such as sphagnum moss, which is further surrounded in a moisture barrier such as plastic film. Rooting hormone is often applied to encourage the wounded region to grow roots. When sufficient roots have grown from the wound, the stem from the parent plant is removed and planted. It can take the layer from a few weeks to one or more growing seasons to produce sufficient roots; this is largely dependent on the plant species and the vigor of the parent plant.

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