Layla AbdelRahim

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Layla AbdelRahim in Sebastopol, May 2006

Layla AbdelRahim is a Canadian comparatist anthropologist and author, whose works on narratives of civilization and wilderness have contributed to the fields of literary and cultural studies, animal studies, philosophy, sociology, anarcho-primitivst thought, epistemology, and critique of civilization and education.[1][2] She attributes the collapse in the diversity of bio-systems and environmental degradation to monoculturalism and the civilized ontology that explains existence in terms of anthropocentric utilitarian functions.[3]

Her books Children’s Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundation: Narratives of Civilization and Wilderness (Routledge 2014) and Wild Children – Domesticated Dreams: Civilization and the Birth of Education[4] (Fernwood 2013) make a contribution to children’s literary theory and a critique of education as rooted in the civilized need for the domestication of children as resources.[5]

Education[edit]

AbdelRahim received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. from the Université de Montréal, Department of Comparative Literature. Her dissertation entitled Order and the Literary Rendering of Chaos: Children’s Literature as Knowledge, Culture, and Social Foundation, examines the effect of ontological premises on human self-knowledge (anthropology) and the repercussions of such knowledge on the anthropogenic destruction of the world’s life systems and diversity.[6]

Thought[edit]

AbdelRahim traces the root of all oppression to the ontological premises of domestication that define the raison d'être of living and non-living beings in terms of consumption and co-existence in a hierarchy of food chain.[7] Drawing on paleontological studies, ethology, and biological anthropology, she challenges the precepts in the narrative of anthropology that constructs the human as predator and consumer. This critique extends to civilized economic and socio-political cultures and their effect on the environment as well as on systems of education and parenting.[8][9][10][11] Her examination of civilized and wild narratives is relevant to a variety of domains and disciplines, such as philosophy of science, evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, environmental economics, education, literary theory.

Media appearances[edit]

AbdelRahim is featured in anOther Story of Progress, a documentary film by Thomas Toivonen, as one of world's leading contemporary anarcho-primitivist philosophers.[12]

Selected works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • AbdelRahim, Layla (2014). Children’s Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundation: Narratives of Civilization and Wilderness. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-66110-2. 
  • Wild Children – Domesticated Dreams: Civilization and the Birth of Education. Halifax: Fernwood. 2013. ISBN 978-1-552-66548-0. 

Articles[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Routledge. "Children's Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundation: Narratives of Civilization and Wilderness (Hardback)". Routledge. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  2. ^ Posted on May 5, 2011 at 8:29 pm. (2011-05-05). ""Primitivism" 101". Deep Green Philly. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  3. ^ "Interview with Layla AbdelRahim". In the Land of the Living. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  4. ^ The book launch during "La journée contre la civilisation" at La Déferle (May 19, 2013) http://www.mediarechercheaction.info/?p=602
  5. ^ Routledge. "Children's Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundation: Narratives of Civilization and Wilderness (Hardback)". Routledge. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  6. ^ "PAPYRUS - Université de Montréal: Order and the literary rendering of chaos : children's literature as knowledge, order, and social foundation". Papyrus.bib.umontreal.ca. 2011-11-03. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  7. ^ miltsovorg. "Layla AbdelRahim - How Ivan the Fool Defeats Civilized Pedagogies". YouTube. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  8. ^ "Coop média de Montréal | Journalisme indépendant". Montreal.mediacoop.ca. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  9. ^ "Avatar: An Anarcho-Primitivist Picture of the History of the World (Layla AbdelRahim)". The Anarchist Library. 2010-01-21. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  10. ^ "Beyond the Symbolic and towards the Collapse (Layla AbdelRahim)". The Anarchist Library. 2009-08-18. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  11. ^ "Domestication, aliénation et civilisation (Layla AbdelRahim)". Montreal.mediacoop.ca. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  12. ^ "anOther Story Of Progress | Watch Documentary Online Free". Documentary Heaven. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 

External links[edit]