Lazy river

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This article is about the amusement ride. For the song, see (Up A) Lazy River. For the 1934 film, see Lazy River (film).

A lazy river is a water ride found in many amusement parks or water parks. They are also found at some hotels, resorts, and recreation centers. It usually consists of a shallow (2½ ft. to 3½ ft.) pool that flows similarly to a river.[1] There is generally a slow current, usually just enough to allow guests to gently ride along lying on rafts. There may also be scenic elements added, such as small waterfalls on the edge of the river. Some lead into wave pools, while some just go around in circles.

The lazy river of Boulder Beach, at Silverwood Theme Park
An indoor lazy river at the Water Park of America in Minnesota

A torrent river, or wave river, is a related concept. Torrent rivers feature wave machines similar to those that are in wave pools; the waves then push riders (who are on rafts, as they are in a regular lazy river) around the river faster than they would be traveling in a regular lazy river. Torrent rivers appear at all of the Schlitterbahn water parks. Most have a policy of no swimming-everybody must ride in a tube.

A current channel is another water feature found in aquatic facilities that uses moving water for enjoyment. A current channel usually consists of water of 3–5 feet deep and the width of the channel no greater than 10 feet. Water flows similarly to a lazy river but because of the depth can be used for aquatic therapy and swimming or walking against the current.

Appearances[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ White, Jill E. (2012). Starguard: Best Practices for Lifeguards. Human Kinetics. p. 209. Retrieved 18 September 2013.