LeRoy Butler

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LeRoy Butler
LeRoy Butler.jpg
LeRoy Butler at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee.
No. 36
Safety
Personal information
Date of birth: (1968-07-19) July 19, 1968 (age 45)
Place of birth: Jacksonville, Florida
Height: 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) Weight: 204 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school: Jacksonville (FL) Lee
College: Florida State
NFL Draft: 1990 / Round: 2 / Pick: 48
Debuted in 1990
Last played in 2001
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions 38
INT yards 533
Sacks 20.5
Stats at NFL.com

LeRoy Butler, III (born July 19, 1968) is a former American football strong safety who played his entire career with the Green Bay Packers (1990–2001). He spent his childhood in Jacksonville, Florida, challenged by physical problems that forced him to wear leg braces and use a wheelchair at times while undergoing therapy.[1] In 2007, he was named to the Florida High School Association All-Century Team, which selected the "Top 33" players in the 100-year history of Florida high school football.

High School career[edit]

Butler attended Robert E. Lee High School in Jacksonville, Florida, and played under the direction of the all time wins leader for a high school football coach in the state of Florida's history, Corky Rogers. Rogers has coached at both Robert E. Lee High School from 1972–1988, where he coached Butler and fellow NFL star Edgar Bennett, and from 1989–present at The Bolles School in Jacksonville, now having won a total of 8 football State Championships. Before moving onto Florida State, Butler was an outstanding player for the Robert E. Lee High School Generals football program.

College career[edit]

Butler played under head coach Bobby Bowden at Florida State University. He was a three-year starter, collecting 194 tackles and 9 interceptions, but he's most remembered by FSU fans for his role in the, "puntrooskie."[2] In 1988, against rival Clemson, FSU was backed up to its own 21-yard line, on fourth down, with a minute and 30 seconds left to play and the score tied at 21. Bowden called the famous trick play, a fake punt. The snap went to upback Dayne Williams and he slipped the ball to Butler, who ran 78 yards to set up the game-winning field goal.

NFL career[edit]

Accolades and Accomplishments[edit]

Butler was selected by the Packers in the second round of the 1990 NFL draft. He played in 181 games, earned a Super Bowl ring, for Super Bowl XXXI, following the 1996 season, was selected as an All-Pro five times and was selected to the Pro Bowl four times (1993, 1996, 1997, and 1998). He was named to the 1990s NFL All Decade Team, by the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and was later inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, in 2007.

After being selected to his first Pro Bowl, the emphasis of his first name was questioned by sports commentator John Madden, who was told by Packers running back Edgar Bennett that his name is pronounced ("LEE-Roy"); but, after hearing a broadcast, Butler's mother sent an e-mail to Madden describing the emphasis as ("L'ROY"). During his 12 seasons with the Packers, he recorded 953 tackles, 38 interceptions, 553 return yards, 12 fumble recoveries, 3 defensive touchdowns and 20½ sacks. He led or tied for the team lead in interceptions in five different seasons. He was the first defensive back in NFL history to gain entrance in the 20 Sack/20 Interception Club.

A broken shoulder blade sustained while tackling Atlanta Falcons running back Jamal Anderson in the 2001 season forced him into retirement just before the 2002 season when it was discovered it had not healed properly.[3]

Lambeau Leap[edit]

Butler is credited with inventing the Lambeau Leap[4] - a touchdown celebration in which the scoring player leaps into the arms of awaiting fans in the stands near the end zone. On December 26, 1993, the Packers were playing the visiting Los Angeles Raiders. On a second-down swing pass to running back Randy Jordan, Butler forced a fumble that was recovered by Reggie White at the Raiders' 35-yard-line. After running with the ball for 10 yards, White lateraled to Butler, who ran the remaining 25 yards into the end zone and then made a spontaneous leap into the arms of fans in the south bleachers. The Packers went on to win 28-0 to clinch what would be the first of six consecutive playoff berths. The move was later popularized by wide receiver Robert Brooks, who carried it a step further by leaping completely into the stands. This move is called the Lambeau Leap and now is used after most Packer touchdowns scored at Lambeau Field.

NFL stats[edit]

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Yards per Interception Return Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Passes Defended
1990 GB 16 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 3 42 14 28 0 0
1991 GB 16 0 0 0 0.0 0 1 0 3 6 2 6 0 0
1992 GB 15 0 0 0 0.0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
1993 GB 16 89 73 16 1.0 2 1 0 6 131 22 39 0 23
1994 GB 13 63 47 16 1.0 1 0 0 3 68 23 51 0 5
1995 GB 16 100 82 18 1.0 1 0 0 5 105 21 76 0 13
1996 GB 16 87 65 22 6.5 1 1 0 5 149 30 90 1 14
1997 GB 16 102 70 32 3.0 1 0 0 5 4 1 2 0 10
1998 GB 16 86 61 25 4.0 3 2 0 3 3 1 3 0 15
1999 GB 16 67 49 18 1.0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 6
2000 GB 16 92 67 25 2.0 2 1 0 2 25 13 22 0 7
2001 GB 9 40 31 9 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Career 181 726 545 181 20.5 11 8 0 38 533 14 90 1 95

[5]

LeRoy Butler Ford[edit]

From 2009 to 2012, Butler owned a Ford dealership named LeRoy Butler Ford in Waupaca, Wisconsin. However, it was sold in 2012.

References[edit]