Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz

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Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz
African Jazz at the Hotel Plaza.jpg
African Jazz performing at Hotel Plaza in Brussels, during the Congolese Round Table Conference in January 1960.
Background information
Also known as African Jazz
Origin Belgian Congo
Republic of Congo
Zaire
(modern-day Democratic Republic of Congo)
Genres Congolese Rumba

Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz (often referred to simply as African Jazz) was one of the first full-time, professional band in what was then called Belgian Congo, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was founded by Joseph Kabasele Tshamala, popularly known as Le Grand Kallé.

The band was invited to Brussels in 1960 to play at the Congolese Round Table Conference, where they were amongst the first bands to introduce modern African music to Europe.

Among their most popular songs was "Indépendance Cha Cha"[1] (1960) the pan-African hit which, like much of their recorded output, used Latin American rhythms like the Cuban chachachá. They were, together with among others Franco Luambo's OK Jazz band, pioneers of the African variant of Rumba, that later evolved into Soukous.

Band members Simaro Lutumba, Tabu Ley Rochereau and Sam Mangwana were later successful with their own bands.

Personnel[edit]

This article on a musical group does not include a complete listing of members; you can help by expanding it.

Discography[edit]

Contributing artist

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ (French) http://www.mondomix.com/actualite/725/independence-cha-cha-histoire-d-un-tube.htm "Indépendance Cha Cha" : Histoire d'un tube