Le Mouvement socialiste

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"Mouvement socialiste" redirects here. For the historical political party in the Canadian province of Quebec, see Mouvement socialiste (Canada).
Syndicalism
"The Hand That Will Rule The World—One Big Union"

The Le Mouvement socialiste (en: The Socialist Movement) was a revolutionary syndicalist journal in France founded in 1899 by Hubert Lagardelle and dissolved in 1914.[1] Other key founders included Karl Marx's grandson Jean Longuet and Émile Durkheim's nephew Marcel Mauss.[2] It advocated segregation of social classes; opposed bourgeois life, democracy, universal suffrage, and parliamentarism; and supported a society led by "conscious, rebellious" men that would develop a disciplined bold new man as part of a "worker's army".[3] The journal was popular and attracted an international audience in its examination of Marxism and revolutionary syndicalism, with well-known revolutionary syndicalists contributing to it, such as Georges Sorel and Victor Griffuelhes.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. Thomas Lane. Biographical dictionary of European labor leaders. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc, 1995. Pp. 533.
  2. ^ Marcel Fournier. Marcel Mauss: a biography. English translation edition. Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press, 2006. Pp. 100.
  3. ^ John Hellman. The communitarian third way: Alexandre Marc's ordre nouveau, 1930-2000. McGill-Queen's University Press, 2002. Pp. 35.
  4. ^ A. Thomas Lane. Biographical dictionary of European labor leaders. Westport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc, 1995. Pp. 533.