Le Petit Trianon

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For the Versailles building, see Petit Trianon.
Le Petit Trianon
Le Petit Trianon.jpg
Le Petit Trianon is located in California
Le Petit Trianon
Location Cupertino, California
Coordinates 37°19′15″N 122°2′50″W / 37.32083°N 122.04722°W / 37.32083; -122.04722Coordinates: 37°19′15″N 122°2′50″W / 37.32083°N 122.04722°W / 37.32083; -122.04722
Built 1892
Architect Willis Polk
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 72001552 [1]
Added to NRHP November 15, 1972

Le Petit Trianon is a mansion on the grounds of De Anza College at 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd., in Cupertino, California.

Built in 1892 for Charles A. Baldwin and his wife Ellen Hobart Baldwin, the mansion was once the center of their successful wine-producing estate where the couple was known to entertain lavishly. Baldwin installed a massive stone winery; built underground cellars (today part of the De Anza College grounds) and planted vines from Bordeaux and other regions of France. Under the label Beaulieu, Baldwin's wines were sold in New York, London and Central America.[2]

The design for Le Petit Trianon was drawn from classical French architectural motifs popular in America at the end of the 19th century. It is also the only example of "V" rustic redwood construction remaining in the area. The name Le Petite Trianon stems from its similarities to the architecture of "Le Grand Trianon," built for Louis XIV of France. Similar detail to this French precedent can be seen in Le Petit Trianon's columns, pilasters, windows and wood window shutters.[2]

In 1909, the mansion was sold to Harriet Pullman Carolon, daughter of George Pullman, inventor of the Pullman sleeping car. Carolon also found the home a wonderful setting for elaborate social functions. In 1940, the house was sold to E. F. Euphrat, owner of the Pacific Can Company. Since 1965 the estate has been the site of De Anza College. Remnants of the garden remain; the winery is still there, as are the guest cottages.[2]

The college district planned to demolish the house in 1968, but decided not to after protests by local historians. After its listing on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, grant money for restoration was received, and the house was moved twice: First to make room for the Flint Center (theater) and next yielding to a parking lot. A restoration of the mansion was completed in 1982, and the house now serves as the California History Center.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2006-03-15. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Le Petit Trianon". California's Historic Silicon Valley. National Park Service. Retrieved 2007-03-12. 
  3. ^ "Le Petit Trianon". California History Center. Retrieved 2007-03-12. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Park Service.