Leader of the House (Australia)

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Leader of the House
Photo of the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, Federal Member for Sturt in Parliament of Australia.jpg
Incumbent
Christopher Pyne

since 18 September 2013
Style The Honourable
Appointer Governor-General on the recommendation of the Prime Minister of Australia
Inaugural holder Sir Eric Harrison
Formation 11 May 1951
Deputy Luke Hartsuyker

The [In the Parliament of Australia, the Leader of the House in the House of Representatives is the government minister responsible for the management of government business, involving such matters as:[1]

  • the order in which Government issues are to be dealt with
  • tactical matters in reaction to impediments to such management
  • negotiation with the Opposition's counterpart (the Manager of Opposition Business) about the order in which bills are to be debated, and
  • time allotted for debate.

As the Australian Parliament is bicameral, the Leader of the House must also be aware of developments in the Senate, for example, in order to anticipate whether a bill may be returned to the House with amendments.

The office was instituted in 1951 by the Prime Minister at the time, Robert Menzies.

The current Leader of the House is the Hon. Christopher Pyne MP.

The current Deputy Leader of the House is the Hon. Luke Hartsuyker MP.

List of Leaders of the House[edit]

The following individuals have been appointed as Leader of the Australian House of Representatives:

Order Minister Party Prime Minister Portfolio Term start Term end
1 Sir Eric Harrison[2]   Liberal Menzies Vice-President of the Executive Council
Minister for Defence Production
Minister for Army
Minister for the Navy
11 May 1951 September 1956
2 Harold Holt[3] Treasurer
Minister for Labour and National Service
September 1956 26 January 1966
3 Sir David Fairbairn[3]
 
Holt
 
 
Minister for National Development 26 January 1966 October 1966
4 Billy Snedden[3] Minister for Immigration February 1967 November 1968

McEwen
 
Gorton
5 Dudley Erwin[3] Minister for the Air February 1969 September 1969
n/a Billy Snedden[3] Minister for Labour and National Service November 1969 10 March 1971
6 Reginald Swartz[3] McMahon Minister for National Development 10 March 1971 August 1972
7 Don Chipp[3] Minister for Customs and Excise August 1972 5 December 1972
8 Fred Daly[3] Labor
Whitlam
 
Minister for Services and Property
Minister for Administrative Services
5 December 1972 22 December 1975
9 Ian Sinclair[4] National Country Fraser Minister for Primary Industry 22 December 1975 27 September 1979
10 Ian Viner[3] Liberal Minister for Employment and Youth Affairs 27 September 1979 19 August 1980
n/a Ian Sinclair[4] National Country Minister for Special Trade Representations
Minister for Communications
19 August 1980 7 May 1982
11 James Killen[3] Liberal Vice-President of the Executive Council 7 May 1982 11 March 1983
12 Mick Young[5] Labor Hawke Special Minister of State
Vice-President of the Executive Council
11 March 1983 14 July 1983
13 Lionel Bowen[6] Deputy Prime Minister
Vice-President of the Executive Council
14 July 1983 21 January 1984
n/a Mick Young[5] Special Minister of State
Minister for Immigration and Ethnic Affairs
Minister for Immigration, Local Government and Ethnic Affairs
Vice-President of the Executive Council
Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for Multicultural Affairs
21 January 1984 12 February 1988
14 Kim Beazley[7] Vice-President of the Executive Council
Minister for Defence
Minister for Transport and Communications
Minister for Employment, Education and Training
Minister for Finance
15 February 1988 11 March 1996

Keating
 
15 Peter Reith[8] Liberal Howard Minister for Industrial Relations
Minister for Workplace Relations and Small Business
Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business
Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service
Minister for Defence
11 March 1996 8 October 2001
16 Tony Abbott[9] Minister for Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business
Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations
Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service
Minister for Health and Ageing
26 November 2001 3 December 2007
17 Anthony Albanese[10] Labor
Rudd
 
Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development
and Local Government

Minister for Infrastructure and Transport
3 December 2007 18 September 2013

Gillard
 

Rudd
 
18 Christopher Pyne[11] Liberal Abbott Minister for Education 18 September 2013 incumbent

Note: For terms during the period 1951 to 1972, exact dates are taken from changes in Prime Minister. Other dates coincide with sitting periods of the House as an approximation of when terms began and ended.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chapter 2: House, Government and Opposition". House of Representatives Practice. pp. 63–64. 
  2. ^ Macintyre, Stuart (1996). "Harrison, Sir Eric John". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 20 September 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Appendix 8: Leaders of the House". House of Representatives Practice. 
  4. ^ a b Australian Parliamentary Library. "Ian McCahon Sinclair". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Australian Parliamentary Library. "Mick Young". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  6. ^ Australian Parliamentary Library. "Lionel Bowen". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  7. ^ Australian Parliamentary Library. "Kim Beazley". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  8. ^ Australian Parliamentary Library. "Peter Reith". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  9. ^ Australian Parliamentary Library. "Tony Abbott". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  10. ^ Australian Parliamentary Library. "Anthony Albanese". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 16 February 2013. 
  11. ^ Australian Parliamentary Library. "Christopher Maurice Pyne". Trove. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 28 March 2012.