Leading line

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Man-made leading line in the Archipelago sea. The photographer is to the left of the line.

A leading line, called a "range" in the United States, is a line formed by a pair of marks, which are generally man-made, that are used in position fixing and navigation,[1] to indicate a safe passage through a shallow or dangerous channel. If lighted the marks are called "leading lights" in British English and "range lights" in the United States.

Leading lights are often used in the entrances to harbours or estuaries where there are hazards close to a deep channel.

Also, in art, Leading Lines are lines that guide your eye through the painting or photograph.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ialathree.org/dictionary/index.php?title=Leading_line Dictionary of the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities