Leander Babcock

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Leander Babcock
Leander Babcock.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 23rd district
In office
March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1853
Preceded by William Duer
Succeeded by Caleb Lyon
Personal details
Born March 1, 1811 (1811-03)
Paris, New York
Died August 18, 1864 (1864-08-19) (aged 53)
Richfield Springs, New York
Citizenship  United States
Political party Democratic Party
Spouse(s) Ellen B. Babcock
Alma mater Union College
Profession Attorney

politician

Leander Babcock (March 1, 1811 – August 18, 1864) was a Democratic United States Representative for the 23rd district of New York.

Biography[edit]

Babcock was born in Paris, New York in 1811. He first attended Hamilton College and then transferred to Union College where he was a member of The Kappa Alpha Society and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and graduated in 1830. He studied law at Union College and was admitted to the New York bar in 1834.

Career[edit]

Babcock moved to Oswego, New York where he practiced law. From 1840 to 1843 he served as the district attorney for Oswego County. He then became mayor of Oswego.[1]

Elected to the 32nd United States Congress, Babcock served from March 4, 1851 to March 3, 1853.[2] After his term in office, he returned to Oswego and served as president of its board of education in 1855 and as an alderman from 1856 to 1858.

Death[edit]

Babcock died in Richfield Springs, New York on August 18, 1864 (age 53 years, 170 days). He is interred at Riverside Cemetery in Oswego, New York.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leander Babcock". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Leander Babcock". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Leander Babcock". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 

External links[edit]


United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
William Duer
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 23rd congressional district

1851–1853
Succeeded by
Caleb Lyon