Lebanese Muslim Association

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Lebanese Moslems Association)
Jump to: navigation, search

Part of a series on
Islam in Australia


Auburn Gallipoli Mosque.JPG

History

Early history
Makasan contact · Afghan cameleers
Battle of Broken Hill
Contemporary society
Halal certification in Australia
Islamophobia in Australia

Mosques

List of Mosques
Auburn Gallipoli Mosque · Central Adelaide
Mosque
 • Lakemba Mosque · Marree Mosque

Organisations

Islamic organisations in Australia
AFIC · ANIC • LMA · IMAA · IISNA • ICQ • ICV • MWA

Groups

Afghan • Albanian • Arab • Bangladeshi
Bosnian • Indian • Indonesian • Iranian
Iraqi • Lebanese • Malay • Pakistani • Turkish

People
Notable Australian Muslims
Grand Mufti of Australia
Taj El-Din Hilaly • Fehmi Naji • Ibrahim Abu Mohamed

The Lebanese Muslim Association (LMA) is an Australian non-profit welfare organisation based in Lakemba, a south-western suburb of Sydney. It is also variously cited as the Lebanese "Moslem", "Moslems" or "Muslims" Association.

The Association was founded between 1961 and 1962 as a community project aiming to serve the "social, religious, recreational and educational" needs of Australian Muslims, and to advocate on their behalf in pursuit of these aims.[1][2] The Association also owns and operates Lakemba Mosque, which is situated close to its head office and is the venue for most of its programs and events.[3]

History[edit]

Lebanese Muslims left the NSW Islamic Society in 1961 to form the Lebanese Muslim Association.[4] The LMA was formally registered as an Australian company limited by guarantee in 1973 and listed as The Lebanese Moslem Association.[5] The entity is registered as a charity, but is not entitled to receive tax deductible gifts.[6]

Zakat[edit]

The LMA collects and distributes Zakat and Sadaqa in accordance with Shariah principles.[7]

Membership[edit]

In 2002, the LMA had more than 1100 financial members, with more than 5000 members attending Friday congregational prayers and "over tens of thousands" (members and non-members) using the Association's facilities on festive occasions.[2] Sheikh Taj El-Din Hilaly, the former Mufti of Australia, is also linked to the LMA, being one of its clerical advisors and an Imam at Lakemba Mosque.[8]

Public figure and spokesperson Samier Dandan has been both vice-president[2] and president[9] in his time with the LMA. Its president is Samier Dandan.[10]

Activities[edit]

In early 2015 the federal government intended to establish early intervention programs to counter violent extremism, as part of $630 million package. The LMA said they would not participate, with one source saying this is because the funding is "paltry" with a lack of ongoing financial commitment.[11]

Criticism[edit]

In an interview in April 2014 Sheik Taj El-Din Hilaly was critical the LMA, saying they, "don’t seem to have any direction".[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the Lebanese Moslems Association", LMA website. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  2. ^ a b c Trad, K. "Submission to Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission's National Inquiry into Children in Immigration Detention", HREOC website. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  3. ^ "History of Lakemba Mosque", LMA website. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  4. ^ Cleland, B. "MUSLIMS IN AUSTRALIA: A Brief History", ICV website. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  5. ^ "The Lebanese Moslem Association". National Names Index. Australian Securities and Investment Commission. Retrieved 3 February 2007. 
  6. ^ "The Lebanese Moslem Association". ABN Lookup. Government of Australia. 10 July 2013. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "Zakah Request". Lebanese Muslim Association. Retrieved 19 February 2015. 
  8. ^ "Sheikh Services", LMA website. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  9. ^ "Lebanese community reacts to long sentence" (TRANSCRIPT). PM (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). Retrieved 3 February 2007. 
  10. ^ "Australians caught in besieged town in Lebanon" (TRANSCRIPT). AM (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). Retrieved 3 February 2007. 
  11. ^ Snow, deborah (30 January 2015). "Reaching out to radicals: government needs to build better bridges to counter violent extremism". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 19 February 2015. 
  12. ^ Mullany, Ashlee (26 April 2014). "Sheik Taj El-Din Hamid Hilaly blasts Australian Muslim community and says they are heading in the wrong direction". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 1 May 2014. 

External links[edit]