Lecho Formation

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Lecho Formation
Stratigraphic range: Late Cretaceous
Type Geological formation
Underlies Yacoraite Formation
Location
Region South America

The Lecho Formation is a geological formation in Argentina whose strata date back to the Late Cretaceous. Dinosaur remains are among the fossils that have been recovered from the formation.[1]

According to Frankfurt and Chiappe (1999), the Lecho Formation is located in northwestern Argentina and is composed of reddish sandstones. The Lecho is part of the Upper/Late Cretaceous Balbuena Subgroup (Salta Group), which is a near-border stratigraphic unit of the Andean sedimentary basin. The paleoenvironment was a fluvio-lacustrine coastal plain. Fossils from this formation include the titanosaur Saltasaurus along with a variety of avian and non-avian theropods.

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Vertebrate paleofauna[edit]

Dinosaurs reported from the Lecho Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Avisaurus

A. archibaldi

From the Hell Creek Formation, erroneously listed as Lecho in Weishampel et al. 2004.[2]

Elbretornis

E. bonapartei

Scapula, partial coracoid, humerus, partial radius, partial ulna[3]

Enantiornithes

Enantiornis[2]

E. leali[2]

"Postcranial elements."[4]

Enantiornithes

Lectavis[2]

L. bretincola[2]

"Tarsometatarsus and tibiotarsus."[4]

Enantiornithes

Martinavis

M. minor

Partial humerus[3]

Enantiornithes

M. saltariensis

Humerus[3]

M. vincei

Humeri[3]

M. whetstonei

Partial humerus[3]

Noasaurus[2]

N. leali[2]

Isolated elements from the head and foot, as well as a verebral arch.[5] A putative oviraptorosaurian cervical vertebra [6] is likely to belong to this taxon.[7]

Noasaurid abelisaurs

Saltasaurus[2]

S. loricatus[2]

"Partial skeletons of at least [six] individuals, including jaws and armor."[8]

Saltasaurid titanosaurs

Soroavisaurus[2]

S. australis[2]

"Tarsometatarsus and phalanges."[9]

Avisaurid enantiornithes

Yungavolucris[2]

Y. brevipedalis[2]

"Tarsometatarsi."[9]

Enantiornithes

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Weishampel, David B; et al. (2004). "Dinosaur distribution (Late Cretaceous, South America)." In: Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. Pp. 600-604. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "63.7 Provincia de Salta, Argentina; 3. Lower Kirtland Formation," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 603.
  3. ^ a b c d e Walker and Dyke (2009). "Euenantiornithine birds from the Late Cretaceous of El Brete (Argentina)." Irish Journal of Earth Sciences, 27: 15-62.
  4. ^ a b "Table 11.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 213.
  5. ^ "Table 3.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 49.
  6. ^ Frankfurt, N.G., and L.M. Chiappe (1999). "A Possible Oviraptorosaur From The Late Cretaceous of Northwestern Argentina," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 19(1): 101-105.
  7. ^ Agnolin, F.L., and Martinelli, A.G. (2007) "Did oviraptorosaurs (Dinosauria; Theropoda) inhabit Argentina?" Cretaceous Research, 28: 785-790.
  8. ^ "Table 13.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 270.
  9. ^ a b "Table 11.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 214.

References[edit]

  • Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. 861 pp. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.