Lee Wan

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For the South Korean footballer, see Lee Wan (footballer).
This is a Korean name; the family name is Lee.
Lee Wan
Born Kim Hyung-soo
(1984-01-03) 3 January 1984 (age 30)
Nam District, Ulsan, South Korea
Education Kookmin University - Physical Education
Kookmin University Graduate School - Sports Management
Occupation Actor
Years active 2003-present
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Relatives Kim Tae-hee (sister)
Korean name
Hangul 이완
Hanja 李完
Revised Romanization I Wan
McCune–Reischauer I Wan
Birth name
Hangul 김형수
Hanja 金亨洙
Revised Romanization Gim Hyeong-su
McCune–Reischauer Kim Hyŏngsu
Website
http://www.lee-wan.com

Lee Wan (born Kim Hyung-soo on January 3, 1984) is a South Korean actor.

Career[edit]

Born as Kim Hyung-soo, he began his career in entertainment after starring in a music video alongside older sister, actress Kim Tae-hee.[1] Using the stage name Lee Wan, he made his acting debut in 2003. He first drew notice in a supporting role in the television drama Stairway to Heaven, followed by leading roles in romantic comedies Snow White: Taste Sweet Love and Let's Go to the Beach. He reunited with Stairway to Heaven costar Park Shin-hye in 2006 in the melodrama Tree of Heaven.[2]

Lee's increased Korean wave popularity led to him being cast in as the leading man in the Japanese film Veronika Decides to Die (based on the same-titled novel by Paulo Coelho), which screened at the 2005 Tokyo International Film Festival.[3] He also played the leading role opposite Ami Suzuki in the 2007 Japanese television drama Magnolia no Hana no Shita de ("Under the Magnolia"), which portrayed a romance between a Korean man and a Japanese woman who meet while studying in New York City.[4] Afterwards, he returned to Korean television with a supporting role in In-soon Is Pretty, as the protagonist's younger brother.[5]

In 2008, Lee starred in the Korean War film Once Upon a Time in Seoul.[6] He next played a villain in the gambling-themed series Swallow the Sun in 2009.[7]

Lee enlisted for mandatory military service on 12 July 2010, and was part of the entertainment soldiers unit of the Defense Media Agency under the Ministry of National Defense.[8] He was discharged on 23 April 2012.[9]

As his first post-army project, Lee appeared in the 2013 online drama It's Not Over Yet; it aired in 6-part 10-minute installments on social networking sites.[10][11]

Filmography[edit]

Television series[edit]

Film[edit]

Music video[edit]

  • Vibe - "While Looking at the Picture"
  • Vintage Blue - "Love Is"
  • Position - "You Just Being in This World"
  • Tei - "Same Pillow"
  • Tei - "Locked Up in Tears"

Awards[edit]

  • 2004 SBS Drama Awards: New Star Award (Little Women)
  • 2004 KBS Drama Awards: Best New Actor (Snow White: Taste Sweet Love)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "10 LINE: Kim Tae-hee". TenAsia. 28 October 2009. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  2. ^ Shin, Hae-in (1 March 2006). "Tree of Heaven: a new tryout for a resurgence of Korean Wave". The Korea Herald via Hancinema. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  3. ^ "Lee Wan's Fan Meetings Draw 2,000 Japanese Fans". KBS Global. 11 July 2006. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  4. ^ "Lee Wan will lead the Japanese drama Magnolia Flower (목련꽃)". Soompi. 1 December 2006. Retrieved 2014-05-04. 
  5. ^ "Lee Wan returns through the drama In-soon is Pretty". Hancinema. 22 August 2007. Retrieved 2014-05-04. 
  6. ^ Lee, Eun-joo (22 October 2008). "Actors struggle for authenticity in Korean War roles". Korea JoongAng Daily. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  7. ^ Han, Sang-hee (7 July 2009). "Swallow the Sun to Capture Love, Revenge". The Korea Times. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  8. ^ "Lee Wan enters Korean military today". TenAsia. 12 July 2010. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  9. ^ "Lee Wan to be discharged from military today". TenAsia. 23 April 2012. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  10. ^ Kang, Jung-yeon (17 July 2013). "Kahi, Lee Wan to be on SNS Drama". TenAsia. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  11. ^ Chung, Ah-young (13 October 2013). "New drama genres branch out from SNS, podcasts". The Korea Times. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 

External links[edit]