Left Front (magazine)

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For other uses, see Left Front.

Left Front Magazine (1930?-1935) was an American magazine published by the Chicago chapter of the John Reed Club,[1] itself a Marxist club for writers, artists, and intellectuals, named after the American journalist, activist, and poet, John Reed. The magazine is most famous for being a major early publishing venue of American author Richard Wright.

Richard Wright[edit]

In 1933, Richard Wright joined the Chicago chapter of the John Reed Club at the urging of friend Abraham Aaron.[2] The same year, he is elected executive secretary of the chapter.[3] By early 1934, Wright began writing poetry for the chapter's magazine, Left Front.[4][5] He published poems "A Red Love Note" and "Rest for the Weary" in the January–February 1934 issue[6] and became co-editor of the magazine at the same time.[1][7] "Everywhere Burning Waters Rise" appeared in the May–June 1934 issue of Left Front.[8][9]

Demise[edit]

While some sources say the CPUSA shut down the magazine in 1935,[2][10] its demise most likely came in August 1934 during a Midwest Writers Congress, when publisher Alexander Trachtenberg proposed replacement of the John Reed Club with a new (i.e., Party-sanctioned) organization called the First American Writers Congress.[11]

See also[edit]

  • New Masses: magazine associated with the John Reed Club's New York chapter
  • Daily Worker: newspaper published by the CPUSA from headquarters in Chicago

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Richard Wright: John Reed Club". George Washington University. Retrieved May 30, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Wright, Richard (1940). Native Son. Harper & Brothers. p. 468. 
  3. ^ "Richard Wright: Chronology 1931–1935". George Washington University. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Richard Wright". University of North Carolina: All American encyclopedia. Retrieved May 30, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Richard Wright: Chronology". University of Illinois at Champlain: Modern American Poetry. Retrieved May 30, 2010. 
  6. ^ "On Richard Wright's Poetry". University of Illinois at Champlain: Modern American Poetry. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Richard Wright: Life". University of Illinois at Champlain: Modern American Poetry. Retrieved May 30, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Richard Wright: Chronology". Independent Television Service (ITVS). Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Richard Wright: Primary (Poetry and Secondary Source Bibliographies". University of Illinois at Champlain: Modern American Poetry. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Richard N. Wright". Visit Natchez. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  11. ^ Ward, Jerry Washington (2008). The Richard Wright Encyclopedia. Greenwood Press. p. 137. ISBN 978-0-313-31239-7. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 

External links[edit]