Legion of Doom (hacking)

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Legion of Doom
aka LOD & LOD/H
Formation 1980
Extinction 2000
Purpose/focus Hacking
Location United States
Origin MUHS 9th Hour
Founders Lex Luthor
Products LOD Technical Journals
Affiliations Masters of Deception
MindVox
Cult of the Dead Cow

The Legion of Doom (LOD) was a hacker group active from the 1980s to the late 1990s and early 2000. Their name appears to be a reference to the antagonists of Challenge of the Superfriends. LOD was founded by the hacker Lex Luthor, after a rift with his previous group the Knights of Shadow.

At different points in the group's history, LOD was split into LOD and LOD/LOH (Legion of Doom/Legion of Hackers) for the members that were more skilled at hacking than pure phreaking. The overall beliefs of LOD and MOD (Masters of Deception) were different, but it can be difficult to untangle the actions of the members since there was a cross-over between the two groups.

Unlike the hacking group MOD, there were different opinions regarding what the Legion of Doom was. LOD published the Legion of Doom Technical Journals and contributed to the overall pool of hacking knowledge. They considered themselves not causing any direct harm to the phone systems and computer networks they took over. Still, many LOD members were raided and prosecuted for causing alleged damage to systems (Grant, Darden and Riggs, etc.).

Members of LOD[edit]

1991 Legion of Doom T-Shirt created by Chris Goggans "Erik Bloodaxe"

As of 2012 what has happened to each individual member of the Legion of Doom is unknown. A small handful of the higher-profile LOD members who are accounted for includes: "Erik Bloodaxe", "Mark Tabas", "Karl Marx", "Agrajag the Prolonged", "Automatic Jack", "Bill From RNOC", "Lord Digital", "The Mentor", "Doctor Who", "Dead Lord", "Phiber Optik", who was a member of both LOD and Masters of Deception (MOD), and "Terminus". [1]

Internal and External battles of LOD[edit]

LOD was against wanton destruction of computers which had been hacked. Gary Cohen "Terminal Man" was dismissed from the group for this reason. Other disagreements led to bad blood between Erik Bloodaxe and Mark Tabas. A war with MOD was undertaken, and Erik Bloodaxe led as LOD's general. While Bloodaxe was active in this regard, other LOD members were less so.

Projects of LOD[edit]

In 1992, several members of LOD came together and founded LODCOM, inc, which collected old hacker bulletin board messages for an archive, which was to be sold. Most, if not all, of this material later ended up on textfiles.com. Marauder formed LOD.COM as a consulting company, and several ex-LOD members had accounts on the system. In the late 1990s, a root DNS server had an illicit new TLD of .LOD for over a year.

History of Legion of Doom[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Henry Weinstein (23 Mar 1991). "Hacker Enters Guilty Plea in Theft of Computer Data". Business; PART-D; Financial Desk: Los Angeles Times. p. 2. Retrieved 9 May 2009. 

Public access legal records and transcripts[edit]

  • US Government's Sentencing Memorandum, US v. Grant, Darden and Riggs, Criminal Action Number 1:90-CR-31, December, 1990. (US Government v. "Legion of Doom")
  • LOD Technical Manuals and source notices
  • The Legion of Doom/Hackers Technical Journal