Leif, the Discoverer (Whitney)

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Leif, the Discoverer
LeifTheDiscoverer1887.jpg
Artist Anne Whitney
Year 1887
Type Public Art, Sculpture (bronze, red sandstone)
Dimensions 240 cm (96 in)
Location Juneau Park, Milwaukee
Coordinates 43°2′39.258″N 87°53′50.911″W / 43.04423833°N 87.89747528°W / 43.04423833; -87.89747528Coordinates: 43°2′39.258″N 87°53′50.911″W / 43.04423833°N 87.89747528°W / 43.04423833; -87.89747528

Leif, the Discoverer is a bronze sculpture of Leif Ericson created by American sculptor Anne Whitney in 1887. It is located at Juneau Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The United States of America.

Description[edit]

The figure is approximately 8 feet tall; the upper base is approximately 110 x 84 x 84 inches; the lower base is approximately 12 x 9 x 96 inches. The sculpture is bronze; the base is red sandstone.[1]

Shading his eyes to scan the distance, Leif Ericson stands on a large red sandstone pedestal. Unlike other depictions of Ericson, here he is youthful and clean-shaven. He wears a scale armor shirt, ornamented with breast plates and a studded belt. Underneath, he wears a tunic and leggings with leather sandals. He carries a powder horn over his shoulder and a knife in a decorative sheath at his side. On the sandstone base, the inscription reads, Leif, the discoverer/ son of Erik/ who sailed from Iceland/ and landed on this continent/ A.D. 1000. In runic letters, it also reads, Leif, son of Erik the Red.[1]

Short video of Leif, the Discoverer sculpture.

Historic Information[edit]

The original statue resides in Boston, Massachusetts on Commonwealth Avenue. In November of 1887, the Milwaukee replica was erected; however, at the request of its donor, Mrs. Joseph Gilbert, there was no dedication ceremony. [2] On 26 April 2003, the Sons of Norway Fosselyngen Lodge held a ceremony to celebrate the recent addition of the statue’s lighting, which cost $3,800. The funds were bequested by the late lodge member, Duane Olson. The addition was a joint effort between the Sons of Norway Fosselyngen Lodge, Milwaukee County and the city of Milwaukee.[3] Prior to this, there had been evidence of structural instability, through cracks, erosion, and the deterioration of caulking in a pedestal.[1]

Artist[edit]

Main article: Anne Whitney


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Leif, the Discoverer, (sculpture).". Save Outdoor Sculpture!. Smithsonian Institution. 1992. Retrieved 10 December 2010. 
  2. ^ Federal Writers' Project; Norman K. Risjord (May 2006). The WPA Guide to Wisconsin: The Federal Writers' Project Guide to 1930s Wisconsin. Minnesota Historical Society Press. p. 259. ISBN 978-0-87351-553-5. 
  3. ^ "Leif Eriksson". Leif Eriksson Monuments Pages. René & Peter van der Krogt. 2003. Retrieved 10 December 2010.