Leland Stanford Morgan

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Leland Stanford Morgan (aka Le Morgan; 9 June 1886 San Francisco – 12 August 1981 Oakland, California) was an American commercial artist. He began in 1910 in San Francisco and eventually moved across the bay to Oakland where he remained for the rest of his life.[1][2] Morgan is known for his illustrations of sheet music covers by publishers mostly in the San Francisco Bay area.

Career[edit]

At age 17, Morgan graduated from the California Business College[3] in San Francisco in December 1903.[4] In 1930, Morgan began teaching Fashion Art and Commercial Art at the Fox Art Institute and School of Commercial Art, founded in 1921 in Oakland by Elton Villers Frederick Fox (1893–1970). In 1930, when he began teaching there, they renamed it the Fox-Morgan Art Institute and Commercial Art School. Fox returned to his native home in Victoria, Australia, in 1935, and Ruel Curtis Dean became associated with the school for two years. In 1937, the school was renamed Art Institute on the 3rd floor at 339 15th Street, Oakland, and Morgan became its head.[5][6] Notable alumni of the Fox-Morgan School include Dong Kingman.

Selected sheet music covers[edit]

Jerome H. Remick & Co., Detroit, New York

Music by Wallie Herzer, arranged by Eugene Brown
Cover: caricature of a male college student smoking a pipe with bulldog; "Rah-rah boy" was a reference to a college male. The class of '09 is illustrated on his pipe and sweater. One of the colors, blue, the bulldog, and the scull and bones insignia — taken as a composite — fits a profile of a Yale student. (view, courtesy of the Indiana University Bloomington)
By Wallie Herzer
Cover: caricature of a jolly minstrel or busker banjoist with one or two missing teeth, seated in morning dress: single-breasted black frock coat with notched red-trimmed lapels, red, white, and black-striped top collar, red-trimmed sleeves, lined with single white French-cuffs; white vest; black-and-white checkered bow-tie with matching black-and-white checkered trousers trimmed with white gaiters; gemstone centered on upper shirt- or vest-front below the bow tie; black cap-toe dress shoes with white-stitched welts, topped with red, white, and black striped spats that match the top collar; top hat with red patterned hat band on ground, brim up, casting a shadow; red background, black lettering, white base — signature by Morgan indicates 1910 (view, courtesy of York University, Toronto) (2nd view, courtesy of Mississippi State University)

Frederick V. Bowers Music Publishers, Inc., New York

Composed by Frederick V. Bowers (1874–1961), lyrics by Jesse G. M. Glick (né Jesse Grant Monroe Glick; 1874–1939), (view, courtesy of Gonzaga University)

Buell Music, San Francisco

Lyrics & music by Joseph Buell Carey (view, courtesy of Mississippi State University)
Words & music by Joseph Buell Carey (view, courtesy of Gonzaga University)
Words & music by Joseph Buell Carey (view, courtesy of Gonzaga University)
Words & music by Joseph Buell Carey
Patriotic World War I song
Lyrics & music by Joseph Buell Carey (view, courtesy of The Authentic History Center, Michael Barnes, Ada, Michigan) (2nd view, courtesy of Mississippi State University)
Lyrics & music by Joseph Buell Carey (view, courtesy of www.hulapages.com, Keith Emmons, Brea, California)
Words & music by Joseph Beull Carey (view, courtesy of the Indiana University Bloomington)

McKiernan Publishing, San Jose, California

Lyrics & music by Joseph M. McKiernan, Jr. (view, courtesy of www.hulapages.com, Keith Emmons, Brea, California)

Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco

Lyrics & music James Fulton Kutz (view, courtesy of the Hawaiian Historical Society, Honolulu)
Lyrics Jesse G. M. Glick (né Jesse Grant Monroe Glick; 1874–1939), music by Chris Smith

M. Witmark & Sons, New York

Lyrics by Will M. Hough (1882–1962) & Frank R. Adams, music by Harold Orlob (view, courtesy of www.hulapages.com, Keith Emmons, Brea, California)

Harry L. Newman, Grand Opera House, Chicago

  • "I Want To Meet That Man" ("Who Wrote That Melody") (1913)
Lyrics & music by Will Morrissey & Bert Hanlon (né Adolph Bert Handelsman; 1890–1972) (view, courtesy of Mississippi State University)

Lorden Music, San Francisco

Lyrics by Maurice J. Gunsky (1887–1945), music by Nathan Goldstein (1887–1956) (view, courtesy of www.hulapages.com, Keith Emmons, Brea, California)

Nat. Goldstein Music Pub. Co., San Francisco

Lyrics by Maurice J. Gunsky (1887–1945), music by Nathan Goldstein (1887–1956)
Cover: illustration of a man and woman in a car under the full moon (view, courtesy of Mississippi State University)

Art Hickman, San Francisco

  • "Rose Room Fox Trot", song without words (1917); OCLC 26004948
By Art Hickman (né Arthur George Hickman; 1886–1930) (Art was a pianist from San Francisco)

Daniels & Wilson, music publishers, San Francisco

Lyrics by Sidney Carter, music by Walter Smith (1885–1968)[7]
  • "Bad Bad Baby" (1917)
Lyrics by Raymond Egan, music by Howard Patrick (view, courtesy of Mississippi State University)
Cover: Marian Harris (née Mary Ellen Harrison; 1897–1944)
    Background illustration by Morgan
Lyrics & music by Howard Patrick
Lyrics by Raymond B. Egan, music by Walter Smith (1885–1968)[7] (view, courtesy of the Indiana University Bloomington)
  • "Oriental" ("Some Day in Araby"), fox trot (1918); OCLC 26005914
Lyrics by Richard Coburn (né Frank Reginald DeLong; 1886–1952), music by Vincent Rose (view, courtesy of www.imagesmusicales.be)
Lyrics & music by Walter Smith (1885–1968)[7]

F.G. Rempe, Oakland, California

Lyrics & music by Frank George Rempe (1891–1959)

J.G. Dewey, San Francisco

By James G. Dewey (né James Godfrey Patrick Dewey; 1878–1964)[8] (view, courtesy of Brown University)

J.A. MacMeekin, New York

Lyrics by Cyril John MacMeekin (1896–1991), music by John Alfred MacMeeken (1874–1960) – John was Cyril's father (view, courtesy of the Hawaiian Historical Society)

Family[edit]

Spouse

Morgan married Ruth Vivian Holloway and had two children, Alan Edgar Morgan, an architect based in the San Francisco Bay area, and Merele Marcella Morgan (1919–2004) who married John Benton Saunders (1917–2010).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Artists in California, 1786–1940, by Edan Milton Hughes, San Francisco, California: Hughes Pub. Co. (1986); OCLC 13323489
  2. ^ Christopher Reynolds and His Descendants, Stephen Frederick Tillman (1959), pg. 109; OCLC 5142810
  3. ^ California Business College was absorbed by Metropolitan Business College in March of 1905: American College and Private School Directory of the United States, Harry J. Myers (ed.), Chicago: Educational Aid Society, Vol. 2, pg. 152 (1908)
  4. ^ "Business School Graduates", San Francisco Call, Vol. 95, No. 18, December 18, 1903, pg. 9, col. 3 (bottom)
  5. ^ Advertisement: "Art Institute of Oakland", Oakland Tribune, August 30, 1937, pg. D5, col. 4
  6. ^ "Advertizing Art is Institute Feature", Berkeley Daily Gazette, December 30, 1935, pg. 7, Col. 1
  7. ^ a b c "Tehachapi Boy Now Composer", Los Angeles Times, October 15, 1923, pg. 18
  8. ^ The Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music: Composers and Their Music (Dewey is in the Supplement – Vol. 3 of 3), by William Harold Rehrig (born 1939); edited by Paul E. Bierley (born 1926), Westerville, Ohio: Integrity Press (1996); OCLC 24606813