Leland v. Oregon

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Leland v. Oregon
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued January 29, 1952
Decided June 9, 1952
Full case name Leland v. Oregon
Citations 343 U.S. 790 (more)
72 S. Ct. 1002; 96 L. Ed. 1302; 1952 U.S. LEXIS 1955
Prior history Appeal from the Supreme Court of Oregon
Holding
The Court upheld the constitutionality of placing the burden of persuasion on the defendant when they argue an insanity defense in a criminal trial.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Clark, joined by Vinson, Reed, Douglas, Jackson, Burton, Minton
Dissent Frankfurter, joined by Black

Leland v. Oregon, 343 U.S. 790 (1952), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court upheld the constitutionality of placing the burden of persuasion on the defendant when they argue an insanity defense in a criminal trial.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonnie, R.J. et al. Criminal Law, Second Edition. Foundation Press, New York, NY: 2004, p. 541

External links[edit]