Leo Barry

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For the Newfoundland politician and jurist, see Leo Barry (Canadian jurist).
Leo Barry
Personal information
Date of birth (1977-05-19) 19 May 1977 (age 37)
Place of birth Deniliquin, New South Wales
Original team Deniliquin (NSW)
Debut Round 22, 3 September 1995, Sydney
v. Collingwood, at SCG
Height/Weight 184 cm / 88 kg
Position(s) Back pocket, fullback
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1995–2009 Sydney Swans 237 (56)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 2009 season.
Career highlights

Leo Barry (born 19 May 1977) is a retired Australian rules footballer in the Australian Football League (AFL) with the Sydney Swans.

Originally from Deniliquin, New South Wales, Barry attended St Ignatius' College, Riverview before being drafted as a zone selection in the 1994 National Draft and making his debut in the final round of the 1995 season against Collingwood. For the next few seasons he played in the forward line without consistency, struggling to find a place in an already strong forward line. He did, however, display an ability to take spectacular jumping marks, earning him the nickname "Leaping Leo".

In 2001, Swans coach Rodney Eade moved Barry to the backline, where he prospered. Despite being short for a fullback at 184 cm, he has successfully played on much taller opponents, making use of his leaping skills and using his body well. Regularly playing on opponents 10–15 cm taller than he is, Barry rarely has multiple goals kicked upon him. Barry's unique defensive ability is observed in 2004 when Barry kept 196 cm St Kilda full forward Fraser Gehrig to two handballs for the whole game (for this effort, he received three Brownlow Medal votes.[1])

Despite being only 184 cm tall, Barry is surprisingly strong which has become a useful necessity for him when facing taller opponents such as Fraser Gehrig, Brendan Fevola, David Neitz, Anthony Rocca, Chris Tarrant, Quentin Lynch, Matthew Lloyd, Jonathan Brown, Daniel Bradshaw and Matthew Richardson, amongst others.

In Round 10, 2005, he had the embarrassing honour of being the fullback playing on Gehrig in what was the St Kilda forward's 200th game, where he kicked eight goals in the match playing on Barry. In Round 1, 2006, he was the fullback playing on Essendon full-forward Matthew Lloyd in what was the latter's first game as Essendon captain; Barry had six of Lloyd's eight goals kicked against him.[2][3]

Barry has twice been included in the All-Australian team, in 2004 and 2005.[4]

On 18 August 2009, Barry announced he would retire from football at the end of the current season.[5]

Barry is now an AFL commentator on Triple M, mainly riding the boundary line during Sydney Swans matches.

"That Mark"[edit]

Barry will always be remembered as the player who "caught the cup" for the Swans. Not only did he ensure the victory for the Swans but Barry's backline heroics were instrumental to the Swans' success which culminated with one of Barry's trademark spectacular marks during the 2005 AFL Grand Final between Sydney and West Coast. After a kick from Dean Cox was sent into the forward line, Barry marked in a big pack within the dying seconds of the game to secure the Swans' long-awaited premiership. Commentator Stephen Quartermain described the mark, as:

"Cox throws it onto the left, one last roll of the dice for the Eagles! Leo Barry you star!..(siren in background)..The longest premiership drought in football history is over! For the first time in 72 years the Swans are the champions of the AFL!"

This image was later used by Tabcorp for promotional purposes, with Barry claiming that the image was "worth A$50,000",[6] despite other players being featured in the photo.

Statistics[edit]

[7]
Legend
 G  Goals  B  Behinds  K  Kicks  H  Handballs  D  Disposals  M  Marks  T  Tackles
Season Team # Games G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
Totals Averages (per game)
1995 Sydney 21 1 1 0 6 2 8 4 0 1.0 0.0 6.0 2.0 8.0 4.0 0.0
1996 Sydney 21 5 2 0 13 10 23 5 8 0.4 0.0 2.6 2.0 4.6 1.0 1.6
1997 Sydney 21 10 12 9 67 39 106 30 13 1.2 0.9 6.7 3.9 10.6 3.0 1.3
1998 Sydney 21 16 9 6 82 62 144 38 16 0.6 0.4 5.1 3.9 9.0 2.4 1.0
1999 Sydney 21 17 10 8 127 96 223 88 16 0.6 0.5 7.5 5.6 13.1 5.2 0.9
2000 Sydney 21 17 15 5 112 76 188 63 18 0.9 0.3 6.6 4.5 11.1 3.7 1.1
2001 Sydney 21 19 1 1 143 92 235 84 35 0.1 0.1 7.5 4.8 12.4 4.4 1.8
2002 Sydney 21 13 0 0 89 75 164 43 28 0.0 0.0 6.8 5.8 12.6 3.3 2.2
2003 Sydney 21 24 0 2 182 151 333 133 56 0.0 0.1 7.6 6.3 13.9 5.5 2.3
2004 Sydney 21 23 0 0 139 148 287 107 34 0.0 0.0 6.0 6.4 12.5 4.7 1.5
2005 Sydney 21 26 0 0 213 128 341 152 37 0.0 0.0 8.2 4.9 13.1 5.8 1.4
2006 Sydney 21 25 0 1 224 147 371 173 39 0.0 0.0 9.0 5.9 14.8 6.9 1.6
2007 Sydney 21 18 4 0 145 131 276 116 36 0.2 0.0 8.1 7.3 15.3 6.4 2.0
2008 Sydney 21 20 2 0 149 154 303 125 35 0.1 0.0 7.5 7.7 15.2 6.3 1.8
2009 Sydney 21 3 0 0 20 23 43 14 3 0.0 0.0 6.7 7.7 14.3 4.7 1.0
Career 237 56 32 1711 1334 3045 1175 374 0.2 0.1 7.2 5.6 12.8 5.0 1.6

References[edit]

External links[edit]