Leo J. Ryan Federal Building

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Leo J. Ryan Federal Building
Leo J Ryan Memorial Federal Building entrance.jpg
Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Building
General information
Town or city San Bruno, California
Country United States
Completed 1973
Client United States Government

The Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Building, also known as the Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Archives and Records Center, is a United States government office facility which opened in 1973, and is located in San Bruno, California. It houses the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for the Pacific Sierra Region of the United States. The building was renamed in honor and memory of U.S. Representative Leo J. Ryan, through Congressional legislation which passed in 1984.

The NARA describes the building as "an integral part of the Bay Area's network of world class public historical research centers and cultural institutions."[1] The holdings in the facility are a major primary resource for study in the fields of Asian-Pacific immigration, environmental, Naval, Native American,[2] as well as other aspects of American history,[3] including genealogical records pertaining to the Chinese Exclusion Act.[4]

In 1993, the building underwent accessibility improvements to its architectural design, which were performed by Interactive Resources.[5] The building is owned and managed by the General Services Administration.[6] A San Mateo County publication identified the building as a "local treasure."[7]

Tribute to Congressman Leo J. Ryan[edit]

Representative Leo J. Ryan
Act naming building as the "Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Archives and Records Center", 1984.

The building was named in honor and memory of Representative Leo J. Ryan, a United States congressman. Congressman Ryan was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 1983.[8][9][10]

Congressman Tom Lantos introduced a bill in 1983 in the United States Congress: ..to designate the Federal Archives and Records Center in San Bruno, California as the "Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Archives and Records Center".[11] The bill passed by unanimous consent in the House of Representatives and Senate, and was signed by President Ronald Reagan and became public law 98-580 on October 30, 1984.[11]

Specifications[edit]

The Leo J. Ryan Federal Building is surrounded by a cyclone fence, and functions effectively as a bunker. The building itself is kept isolated - the federal government owns the property behind the building, and no other government tenants are near the facility. After the Oklahoma City bombing, where a federal building was destroyed by explosives, the federal government has taken care to isolate sensitive archived records and documents away from other government agencies.[12] The building houses over 200 million records from 110 different United States federal agencies, as well as 10,000 records from federal courts of the Pacific Sierra region.[12] Records staffers make over 100,000 photocopies per year.[12] It would take 40 people approximately 100 years to microfilm all of the records currently available at the National Archives and Records Administration division of the Leo J. Ryan Federal Building.[12]

As of 1998, the budget for the Pacific Sierra Region of the National Archives and Records Administration was USD$1,000,000 per year, and annual visits to the archives numbered over 15,800.[12] The building is specifically designed for the archiving of government documents - it is isolated, fireproof, and climate-controlled.[12] The temperature within the records rooms is kept at 70 °F (21 °C) and humidity at 50%.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pacific Region, National Archives and Records Administration, San Bruno, California, retrieved 2/26/07.
  2. ^ Native American Resources, Preliminary inventory of the records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs: Northern California and Nevada Agencies, libraries, UC Berkeley, retrieved 2007-02-26.
    Inventories the records of the northern California and Nevada jurisdictions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs from 1864 to approximately 1920. Chronological arrangements are rough due to poor record-keeping. The records described are housed in the Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Archives and Records Center, San Bruno, CA.
  3. ^ Pacific Region (San Francisco), National Archives and Records Administration, San Bruno, California, retrieved 2007-02-26.
  4. ^ Davis, Lisa (November 4, 1998). "The Progeny of Citizen Wong". SF Weekly (Village Voice Media). 
  5. ^ Leo J. Ryan Federal Records Center, Accessibility Upgrade, Interactive Resources, retrieved 2007-02-26.
    Interactive Resources provided architectural design and construction administration services for the accessibility improvements for this large Federal Records Center. The scope of the work was established by a previous Building Engineering Report (BER), which was also prepared by Interactive Resources in 1993.
  6. ^ California Buildings and Properties, Key GSA-Owned Facilities in California, General Services Administration, retrieved 2007-02-26.
    Leo J. Ryan Federal Records Center, 1000 Commodore Drive, San Bruno, California, 94066-2350 - Sansome Office.
  7. ^ Healthtracks, Spring 2002, Vol. 13, Issue 2., P. 7.
    Local Treasures, National Archives and Records Administration, Pacific Region, Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Building, www.nara.gov/regional/sanfranc.html
  8. ^ Statement on Signing the Bill Authorizing a Congressional Gold Medal Honoring the Late Representative Leo J. Ryan, President Ronald Reagan, November 18, 1983
  9. ^ The Washington Post, November 30, 1984 v107 pC4 col 5 (10 col in), "Leo Ryan honored. (with Medal of Honor)" Jacqueline Trescott.
  10. ^ The New York Times, November 27, 1984 v134 pA25(L) col 2 (4 col in) "Reagan to give medal for slain congressman."(Leo J. Ryan)
  11. ^ a b H.R.4473 : Title: A bill to designate the Federal Archives and Records Center in San Bruno, California as the "Leo J. Ryan Memorial Federal Archives and Records Center"., Sponsor: Rep Lantos, Tom [CA-11] (introduced 11/18/1983), Became Public Law No: 98-580., on 10/30/1984.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Davis, Lisa (November 4, 1998). "Tales of the Country: How Tokyo Rose, "Machine Gun" Kelly, and Amelia Earhart are endangered by money-saving moves at the National Archives in San Bruno". SF Weekly. .

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°37′55″N 122°25′29″W / 37.631975°N 122.424693°W / 37.631975; -122.424693