Leonard Brockington

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Leonard Brockington

Leonard Walter Brockington, CMG, QC, LLD (6 April 1888 – 15 September 1966) was a Canadian lawyer, civil servant, public figure, and the first head of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

Born in Cardiff, Wales, one of seven children,[1] Brockington was educated at the University of Wales, graduating with honours in Latin and Greek. He arrived in Canada in 1912. Settling in Edmonton, Brockington became a journalist and civil servant. He studied law at the University of Alberta and became a solicitor for the city of Calgary. He then joined the Calgary law firm of James Lougheed and R. B. Bennett.

He served as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the CBC from 1936 to 1939. He also served as:

An annual Visitorship was established at Queen's in 1968, to honour the memory of Brockington, with the help of funding from the Samuel McLaughlin Foundation. The Visitorship brings "a person of international distinction" to come to Queen's to deliver a public lecture, and to meet formally and informally with faculty, students, and community members.

Queen's has also named Brockington House, a student residence, in his memory. In 1946, he was made a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Foran, Max (1987). Citymakers : Calgarians after the frontier. Calgary: Historical Society of Alberta, Chinook Country Chapter. p. 85. ISBN 0-88925-725-6. 
  2. ^ Brockington, Leonard (1954). "St. George and Merrie England". The Empire Club of Canada Speeches 1953-1954. The Empire Club Foundation. Retrieved 2007-02-05. 

External links[edit]

Government offices
Preceded by
Position Created
President of the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

1936–1939
Succeeded by
René Morin