Lesser Slave Lake

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This article is about the lake in Alberta. For the electoral district, see Lesser Slave Lake (electoral district). For the lake in the Northwest Territories, see Great Slave Lake.
Lesser Slave Lake
SW Lesser Slave Lake.jpg
SE corner of the lake from Martin Mountain (looking South). Dog Island, Devonshire Beach, and the town of Slave Lake are visible in the distance.
Location Big Lakes / Lesser Slave River No. 124, Alberta
Coordinates 55°26′26″N 115°29′19″W / 55.44056°N 115.48861°W / 55.44056; -115.48861Coordinates: 55°26′26″N 115°29′19″W / 55.44056°N 115.48861°W / 55.44056; -115.48861
Type Eutrophic[1]
Primary inflows Assineau River, Driftpile River, Heart River, Marten River, Swan River
Primary outflows Lesser Slave River
Catchment area 13,900 km2 (5,400 sq mi)[2]
Basin countries Canada
Max. length +100 km (62 mi)
Max. width 15 km (9.3 mi)
Surface area 1,168 km2 (451 sq mi)[3]
Average depth 11.4 m (37 ft)
Max. depth 20.5 m (67 ft)
Water volume 13.69 km³[2]
Shore length1 247 km (153 mi)
Surface elevation 578 m (1,896 ft)
Settlements Slave Lake
References [1][2][3]
1 Shore length is not a well-defined measure.

Lesser Slave Lake is a lake located in central Alberta, Canada, northwest of Edmonton. It is the second largest lake entirely within Alberta boundaries (and the largest easily accessible by vehicle), covering 1,160 km2 (450 sq mi) and measuring over 100 km (62 mi) long and 15 km (9.3 mi) at its widest point. Lesser Slave Lake averages 11.4 m (37 ft) in depth and is 20.5 m (67 ft) at its deepest. It drains eastwards into the Athabasca River by way of the Lesser Slave River.

The town of Slave Lake is located at the eastern tip of the lake, around the oultflow of Lesser Slave River. According to the town's website, the name Slave Lake originated with "an aboriginal nation derogatorily named 'Slavee' by several tribes of the invading Cree nation."

Conservation and development[edit]

Lesser Slave Lake in the Center of Alberta
Lesser Slave Lake at Canyon Creek

Due to its location on a major fly-way for migrating birds, Lesser Slave Lake is popular with birders.[4] The nearby Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park has lakeside camping facilities located along sand beaches, with some rocky beaches as well. Fishing is popular and legal. The entire north shore of the lake is protected, other reserves being Hilliard's Bay Provincial Park, Lesser Slave Lake Wildland and Grouard Trail Park Reserve.

Highway 2 and the Canadian National Railway follow the southern shore of the lake, and the Bicentennial Highway has its southernmost point at eastern end of the lake.

A number of Indian reserves are established at the shores of the lake:

2011 helicopter crash[edit]

On May 20, 2011, a Bell 212 helicopter crashed into the lake while fighting the 2011 Slave Lake fire. The pilot, 54-year-old Jean-Luc Deba of Montreal, died. On the one-year anniversary, a park at Canyon Creek was named in Deba's honor.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Atlas of Alberta Lakes. "Lesser Slave Lake". Retrieved 2007-05-01. 
  2. ^ a b c International Lake Environment Committee. "Lesser Slave Lake". Archived from the original on 2007-07-13. Retrieved 2007-05-01. 
  3. ^ a b Atlas of Canada. "Lakes of Canada". Retrieved 2007-05-01. 
  4. ^ "Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory". Retrieved 2007-05-01. 
  5. ^ http://calgary.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120520/EDM_jeanlucdeba_120520/20120520/

External links[edit]