Letta Cabinet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Letta cabinet
62nd Cabinet of Italy
Flag of Italy.svg
Letta Cabinet with Giorgio Napolitano.jpg
Date formed 28 April 2013
Date dissolved 22 February 2014
People and organizations
Head of government Enrico Letta
Head of state Giorgio Napolitano
Total number of ministers 22
Member party Democratic Party (10)
New Centre-Right (5)
Civic Choice (1)
Union of the Centre (1)
Italian Radicals (1)
Populars for Italy (1)
Independents (3)
History
Election(s) 2013
Previous Monti Cabinet
Successor Renzi Cabinet

The Letta cabinet was the sixty-second cabinet of the government of Italy announced on 27 April 2013.[1] The cabinet is composed of members of the Democratic Party (PD), The People of Freedom (PdL), Civic Choice (SC), the Union of the Centre (UdC), one member of the Italian Radicals (Rad) and three non-party Independents. The cabinet was the youngest government of Italy until the forming of the Renzi Cabinet, with a median age of 53.[2] The cabinet was sworn in on 28 April and won the confidence vote in both the Chamber of Deputies on 29 April [3] and the Senate on 30 April.[4][5] On 28 September Silvio Berlusconi announced that he was asking to the PdL's five ministers (Angelino Alfano, Maurizio Lupi, Gaetano Quagliariello, Beatrice Lorenzin and Nunzia De Girolamo) to resign from the government over a tax hike.[6] On 15 November 2013, the PdL split.[7] While Berlusconi re-founded the Forza Italia party, all five PdL ministers, led by Alfano, joined the New Centre-Right party.[8] In the same week, another coalition partner, Civic Choice, suffered a split, with minister of defense Mario Mauro leaving the party and founding the new Populars for Italy. Nevertheless, he kept his ministry.[9]

Formation and end[edit]

On 22 April 2013, the President of the Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, after his re-election, immediately started consultations with the chairmen of the Chamber of Deputies, Senate and political forces, after the failure of the previous attempt with Pier Luigi Bersani after the elections, and the establishment of a panel of experts by the President himself (dubbed as wise men by the press), in order to outline priorities and formulate an agenda to deal with the persistent economic hardship and growing unemployment.

On 24 April, Giorgio Napolitano gave to the vice-secretary of the Democratic Party, Enrico Letta, the task of forming a government, having determined that Pier Luigi Bersani, leader of the winning coalition Italy Common Good, could not form a government because it did not have a majority in the Senate. Enrico Letta is the successor of Mario Monti, who resigned on 21 December 2012 but whose government remained in charge for the ordinary administration until 28 April 2013, the day the new government was sworn in.

Letta's cabinet lasted until 22 February 2014 (for a total of 300 days), as the government fell apart after the Democratic Party retired its support of Letta in favour of Matteo Renzi, the 39-year old mayor of Florence and nicknamed "Il Rottamatore" (the scrapper), who succeded Letta as Prime Minister.

Composition[edit]

Prime Minister[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Enrico Letta 2013.jpg
Prime Minister
Enrico Letta
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party

Ministers[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Angelino Alfano EPP cropped.png
Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of the Interior
Angelino Alfano
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
Emma Bonino - World Economic Forum on Europe 2010.jpg
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Emma Bonino
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Italian Radicals
Fabrizio Saccomanni.jpg
Minister of Economy and Finances
Fabrizio Saccomanni
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
Mario Mauro.jpg
Minister of Defense
Mario Mauro
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Populars for Italy
before 23 Nov 2013:
Civic Choice
Annamaria Cancellieri - Quirinale.jpg
Minister of Justice
Anna Maria Cancellieri
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
F Zanonato cropped.jpg
Minister of Economic Development
Flavio Zanonato
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Enrico Giovannini 2011.jpg
Minister of Labour and Social Policies
Enrico Giovannini
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
On. Maurizio Lupi.jpg
Minister of Infrastructures and Transports
Maurizio Lupi
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
Nunzia De Girolamo 2.jpg
Minister of Agriculture, Food and Foresty Policies
Nunzia De Girolamo
28 April 2013 – 27 January 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
Maria Chiara Carrozza.JPG
Minister of Education, University and Research
Maria Chiara Carrozza
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Beatrice Lorenzin.jpg
Minister of Health
Beatrice Lorenzin
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
Andrea Orlando cropped.jpg
Minister of the Environment
Andrea Orlando
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Massimo Bray.jpg
Minister of Cultural Heritage
Massimo Bray
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Enzo Moavero Milanesi.jpg
Minister of European Affairs
Enzo Moavero Milanesi
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Civic Choice
Graziano Delrio 2012.jpg
Minister of Regional Affairs and Autonomies
Graziano Delrio
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Carlo Trigilia.JPG
Minister of Territorial Cohesion
Carlo Trigilia
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Dario Franceschini.jpg
Minister of Relations with Parliament and Coordination of Governamental Activity
Dario Franceschini
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Gaetano Quagliariello 2010.jpg
Minister of Constitutional Reforms
Gaetano Quagliariello
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
Kashetu kyeng cecile.jpg
Minister of Integration
Cécile Kyenge
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Josefa Idem cropped.jpg
Minister of Equal Opportunities, Sport and Youth Policies
Josefa Idem
28 April 2013 – 24 June 2013
Democratic Party
Giampiero D'Alia cropped.jpg
Minister of Public Administration and Simplification
Giampiero D'Alia
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Union of the Centre

Deputy Ministers[edit]

Office Name Term Party
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of the Interior
Filippo Bubbico
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Lapo Pistelli, Policy Network, March 27 2009.jpg
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs
Lapo Pistelli
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs
Bruno Archi
2 May 2013 – 6 December 2013
Forza Italia
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
Marta Dassù 2011.jpg
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs
Marta Dassù
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of Economy and Finance
Stefano Fassina
2 May 2013 – 10 January 2014
Democratic Party
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of Economy and Finance
Luigi Casero
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
New Centre-Right
before 15 Nov 2013:
The People of Freedom
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of Economic Development
Carlo Calenda
28 April 2013 – 22 February 2014
Civic Choice
Antonio Catricalà.JPG
Deputy Minister of Economic Development
Antonio Catricalà
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent
Maria Cecilia Guerra - Trento.JPG
Deputy Minister of Labour and Social Policies
Maria Cecilia Guerra
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party
Vincenzo De Luca.jpg
Deputy Minister of Infrastructures and Transports
Vincenzo De Luca
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Democratic Party

Secretary of the Council[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Filippo Patroni Griffi.jpg
Secretary of the Council of Ministers
Filippo Patroni Griffi
2 May 2013 – 22 February 2014
Independent

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Italy PM-designate Enrico Letta agrees new government". BBC. 27 April 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Dionisi, Brenda (9 May 2013). "It's a governissimo!". The Florentine (183). Retrieved 12 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "Premier Enrico Letta wins confidence vote in House". ANSA. 29 April 2013. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "Letta wins Senate confidence too". ANSA. 30 April 2013. Retrieved 20 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "Factbox: Key ministers in Enrico Letta's new Italian government". Reuters. 27 April 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  6. ^ Berlusconi fa dimettere i ministri Letta: gesto folle per motivi personali Corriere della Sera
  7. ^ "Silvio Berlusconi’s heir Angelino Alfano forms new party in Italy", The Independent, 15 November 2013 
  8. ^ "Alfano lancia il Nuovo centrodestra: «No a Fi per me scelta dolorosa. No a decadenza Berlusconi»", Il Messaggero, 16 November 2013 
  9. ^ "Mauro presenta i Popolari per l’Italia: «Elettori in comune con Ncd, ma idee diverse»", Corriere della Sera, 23 November 2013