Levi H. Greenwood

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Levi Heywood Greenwood[1]
Levi H Greeenwood Massachusetts Senate President 1912-1913.png
Levi H. Greenwood[2]
Member of the
Massachusetts State Senate
3rd Worcester District
In office
January 1909 – January 1913
Preceded by J. Lovell Johnson[3]
Succeeded by Edward Sibley[4]
President of the Massachusetts
State Senate
In office
January, 1912 – January, 1913
Preceded by Allen T. Treadway[5]
Succeeded by Calvin Coolidge[5]
Personal details
Born December 22, 1872
Gardner, Massachusetts
Died April 7, 1930(1930-04-07) (aged 57)
Tucson, Arizona[6]
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Mary Alberta Cann
Children Eleanor Greenwood (Hornblower),[7]
Margaret Greenwood
Richard N. Greenwood
Robert E. Greenwood[8]
Alma mater St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire[9]
Harvard College, Class of 1896[9]
Profession Newspaper Publisher[9] Manufacture of Furniture.[10]

Levi Heywood Greenwood[1] (December 22, 1872[11] – April 7, 1930) was a businessman and Republican politician from Massachusetts in the and early 20th century. He was the father of former Fitchburg Mayor Robert E. Greenwood.

Early years[edit]

Greenwood was born in Gardner, Massachusetts,[9][11][12] to Alvni M. and Helen R. Greenwood,[13] on December 22, 1872.[9]

Marriage[edit]

Greenwood married Mary Alberta Cann of Brooklyn, New York on February 11, 1895.[11] They had four children, Eleanor Greenwood (Hornblower),[7] Margaret Greenwood, Richard Neal[14] Greenwood[15] and Robert E. Greenwood.[15]

Political career[edit]

President of the Massachusetts State Senate[edit]

Greenwood was President of the Massachusetts State Senate in 1912 and 1913.[5]

1913 Election[edit]

In 1913 election Greenwood had initially decided not to run for reelection the Senate but instead to run for Lieutenant Governor, however Greenwood decided to run for reelection to the Senate, however because of his opposition to giving women the right to vote he was a focus of opposition by the suffragist movement,[16] the suffragists threw their support to Edward Sibley,[4] Greenwood's opponent, and with the suffragists help Sibley won.[4]

Business Interests[edit]

Publisher[edit]

Greenwood was the Publisher and President of The Gardner News of Gardner, Massachusetts.[9]

Furniture Manufacturer[edit]

In 1912 Greenwood was one of the Directors[9] of Heywood Brothers and Wakefield Co, manufacturers of Rattan & Reed Furniture[17] in Gardner. By 1921 Greenwood was one of the owners[10][10] By 1926 he was the President of the Heywood-Wakefield Company.[18]

Directorships[edit]

Greenwood was also a corporate director of several banks; The First National Bank of Boston, The First National Bank of Gardner, and street railways; The Paducah Light and Traction Company, The Galveston-Houston Electric Company, and the Columbus Electric Company.[8]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Coolidge, Henry D.: A Manual for the Use of the General Court for 1921 (1921), p. 259.
  • Who's Who in State Politics, 1912, Boston, MA: Practical Politics, (1912), pp. 52–53.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Harvard University Directory, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1914, p. Page 333. 
  2. ^ Who's who in State Politics, 1912, Boston, MA: Practical Politics, 1912, p. 52. 
  3. ^ Coolidge, Henry D. (1907), A Manual for the Use of the General Court for 1907, Boston, MA: The Massachusetts General Court, p. 416. 
  4. ^ a b c Fuess, Claude M. (1940), Calvin Coolidge – The Man from Vermont, Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company, p. 114. 
  5. ^ a b c Coolidge, Henry D. (1921), A Manual for the Use of the General Court for 1921, Boston, MA: The Massachusetts General Court, p. 259. 
  6. ^ Special to The New York Times, "LEVI H. GREENWOOD.; Gardner (Mass.) Banker and Publisher Dies in Arizona.", The New York Times (New York, NY), April 8, 1930: 23. 
  7. ^ a b Married In Andover Church Miss Eleanor Greenwood of Boston and Gardner, Bride of Ralph Hornblower of Arlington, Boston, MA: The Boston Daily Globe, June 16, 1916, p. 13. 
  8. ^ a b Leonard, John William (1922), Who's who in Finance and Banking: A biographical Directory of Contemporaries, Brooklyn, NY: Who's who in Finance Incorporated, p. 283. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Who's Who in State Politics, 1912, Boston, MA: Practical Politics, 1912, p. 53. 
  10. ^ a b c Harvard Alumni Association (June 16, 1921), Harvard Alumni Bulletin XXIII, Number 36, Boston, MA: Harvard Bulletin, Inc., p. 849. 
  11. ^ a b c Marquis, Albert Nelson (1916), Who's Who in New England 2nd. Edition Vol., 2, Chicago, IL: A. N. Marquis, p. 484. 
  12. ^ Harvard College Class of 1896; Twenty Fifth Anniversary Report 1896-1921, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1921, p. Page 237. 
  13. ^ Bathhouse Is Given Gardner, Boston, MA: The Christian Science Monitor, August 21, 1913, p. 4. 
  14. ^ Howes, Durward (1938), America's Young Men: The Official Who's who Among the Young Men of the Nation., American Publications, p. 232. 
  15. ^ a b Leonard, John William (1922), Who's Who in Finance and Banking: A biographical Directory of Contemporaries, Brooklyn, NY: Who's Who in Finance Incorporated, p. 283. 
  16. ^ Strom, Sharon Hartman (2001), Political Woman: Florence Luscomb and the Legacy of Radical Reform, Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, p. 84., ISBN 1-56639-819-3 
  17. ^ Compiled by the Secretary (1918), Report of the Boston Chamber of Commerce for 1917–1918, Boston, MA: Boston Chamber of Commerce, p. 246. 
  18. ^ Lougee v. Commissioner 26 B.T.A. 23, Washington, DC: Board of Tax Appeals, May 10, 1932, p. 23. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Allen T. Treadway
President of the Massachusetts Senate
January, 1912— January, 1913
Succeeded by
Calvin Coolidge
Preceded by
J. Lovell Johnson
Member of the
Massachusetts State Senate
3rd Worcester District

January, 1909— January, 1913
Succeeded by
Edward Sibley