Lewis Mehl-Madrona

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Lewis E. Mehl-Madrona, MD, PhD, (born January 26, 1954, Berea, Kentucky) is the author of the Coyote trilogy. His work discusses healing practices from Lakota, Cherokee and Cree traditions, and how they intersect with conventional medicine (via a social constructionist model). Mehl-Madrona has been writing about the use of imagery and narrative in healing since the 1980s. Mehl-Madrona is certified in psychiatry, geriatrics and family medicine.

Andrew Weil, in his review of Coyote Medicine says of Dr. Mehl-Madrona "Good doctoring requires all the wisdom of religion, all the techniques of magic, and all the knowledge of small-m medicine to be most effective. One way to bring that perspective back into our health care institutions is to look to look to Native American Medicine as a resource. Lewis Mehl-Madrona has much to offer here, since he combines the heritage and experience of a Native American healer with very thorough training in allopathic medicine. On top of that, he has great passion about replacing the reigning biomedical model with a new paradigm, and he is a good writer.

Coyote Medicine is not a medicine of the past, of cultures that are fading. It is also medicine of the future that must be taught in medical schools, practiced in clinics, and brought to all those who seek true health."[1]

His research collaborations include work on various psychological conditions, issues of psychology during birthing, nutritional approaches to autism and diabetes, and the use of healing circles to improve overall health outcomes.

He is now an adjunct professor of anthropology at Johnson State College in Vermont and is Education Director for the Coyote Institute for Studies of Change and Transformation. He has recently joined the core faculty of the PsyD program at Union Institute & University.[2][3][4] He writes a regular column for Futurehealth.org,[5] in which he contributes his insights to modern psychiatry, the frustrations of health care and alternative ways of seeing mental illness, including an article about the January, 2011 tragedy in Tucson, Arizona.[6]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Mehl-Madrona, L.E. (1997) Coyote Medicine. New York: Simon and Schuster. Paperback; Firestone, 1998
  • Mehl-Madrona, L., & Dossey, L,. (2003) Coyote healing: Miracles in native medicine Rochester, Vermont: Bear and Company.
  • Mehl-Madrona, L. (2005) Coyote wisdom: The power of story in healing Rochester, Vermont: Bear and Company
  • Mehl-Madrona, L. (2007) Narrative medicine Rochester, Vermont: Bear and Company
  • Mehl-Madrona, L. (2010) The Healing Power of Story: The Promise of Narrative Psychiatry. Rochester, Vermont: Bear and Company

Selected publications[edit]

  • Mehl, L.E. (1976). Statistical Outcomes of Home Delivery; comparison to similarly selected hospital deliveries. . In Stewart and Stewart, eds., Safe Alternatives in Childbirth. Marble Hill, Missouri: Napsac Publications.
  • Mehl and Peterson (1979). Comparative studies of Psychological Outcomes of Various Childbirth Alternatives. In Stewart and Stewart, ed. 21st Century Obstetrics Now. Marble Hill, Mo.: NAPSAC Publications.
  • Mehl, L.E. (1988). Magic, Medicine, and Shamanism, in Heize, R., Proceedings of the Vth International Conference of Shamanism. Berkeley: University of California (Asian Studies).
  • Mehl, L. (1989). Modern Day Shamanism: Bridging Native American Medicine with Biomedicine. In Doore, G. (ed.). Shaman's Path. Boulder: Shambala.
  • Mehl, L.E. (1994). Chalazion Therapy. In Procedures in Family Practice. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders.
  • Mehl-Madrona L. (2003). Native American herbal pharmacology, healing, and elder care. In Selin H, Shapiro D. Medicine Across Cultures. London: Kluwer.
  • Mehl-Madrona L. (2008) Was Coyote the Original Psychotherapist? In Panter B, ed. Creativity and Madness, Volume 2, Thousand Oaks, CA: AIMED Press.

References[edit]

External links[edit]