Lexington (plantation)

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Lexington
Lexington (plantation) is located in Virginia
Lexington (plantation)
Location 7301 High Point Rd., near Lorton, Virginia
Coordinates 38°38′38″N 77°11′56″W / 38.64389°N 77.19889°W / 38.64389; -77.19889Coordinates: 38°38′38″N 77°11′56″W / 38.64389°N 77.19889°W / 38.64389; -77.19889
Built c. 1775 (1775)
Governing body Mason Neck State Park
NRHP Reference # 13000336[1]
VLR # 029-5612
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 28, 2013
Designated VLR June 18, 2009[2]

Lexington was an 18th-century plantation on Mason's Neck in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The estate belonged to several generations of the Mason family.

Lexington was originally part of the Gunston Hall plantation land tract. It was given to George Mason's eldest son, George Mason V, in 1774.[3] In 1775, George Mason V named his plantation to commemorate the Battle of Lexington in Massachusetts.[3] The mansion at Lexington was probably not constructed until after George Mason V returned from a trip to Europe in 1783.[3] The Lexington Plantation was built in 1775 and survived until it burned in 1879. Its property is included in Mason Neck State Park.[4]

The Lexington site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.[1]

Events[edit]

George Mason V's eldest daughter Elizabeth Mary Ann Barnes Mason (9 March 1785–25 March 1827)[3] married Alexander Seymour Hooe, son of Seymour Hooe and Sarah Alexander, at Lexington on 22 April 1802.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 5/28/13 through 5/31/13. National Park Service. 2013-06-07. 
  2. ^ "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 19 March 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d Gunston Hall. "Family of George Mason of Gunston Hall: George Mason (V) of Lexington". Gunston Hall. Archived from the original on 2008-02-11. Retrieved 2008-02-15. 
  4. ^ Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (June 15, 2010). "Mason Neck State Park: Master Plan Executive Summary, 2010 Update" (PDF). Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. 
  5. ^ Gunston Hall. "Elizabeth Mary Ann Barnes Mason". Gunston Hall. Archived from the original on 2008-02-11. Retrieved 2008-02-15.