Lezim

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Lezim is a folk dance form, from Maharashtra, India.[1]

Dancers carry a small musical instrument with jingling cymbals called the Lezim, after which the dance form is named.This dance is named after a wooden idiophone to which thin metal discs are fitted which produce a jingling sound and the dancers use this while dancing. Dholki, a drum instrument is used as the main percussion music. It is performed dressed in colourful costumes.[2] The dance is frequently used as a fitness drill by schools, militias and other institutions because it involves many calisthenic moves and can be quite strenuous.[3] Lezim is much a vigorous physical exercise and drill as a dance; the formations are in twos and fours and even in a circle.

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  1. ^ Shobhna Gupta (2002), Dances of India, Har-Anand Publications, ISBN 81-241-0866-8, "... Lezim is the most common folk dance associated with physical fitness tradition of the region. The lezim is a small frame to which metal discs are fixed ..." 
  2. ^ Folk Dances of Western India, Rangashree Dances, retrieved 2009-07-21, "... The Lezim dance is named for the instrument used in the dance. The lezim is made of a wooden stick, to which is strung a flexible loop with cymbals or pieces of metal that make a clashing sound ..." 
  3. ^ Kapila Vatsyayan (1987), Traditions of Indian folk dance, Clarion Books, ISBN 81-85120-22-6, "... part and parcel of physical education drill in all schools and colleges ... Lezim is as much a vigorous physical exercise and drill as a dance; the formations are in twos and fours and sometimes even a circle ..."