Li Chang

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Li Chang
Li Chang (politician).jpg
Native name 李昌 (pinyin: Lǐ Chāng)
Born 雷骏随
(1914-12-12)December 12, 1914
Yongshun, Hunan
Died September 3, 2010(2010-09-03) (aged 95)[1]
Beijing
Nationality Chinese
Ethnicity Tujia people[1]
Alma mater Tsinghua University[2]
Political party
Communist Party of China
Spouse(s) Feng Lanrui[3]


Political appointments
Commissioner, CPC Central Advisory Commission[4]
In office
1987–1992
Secretary, CPC Central Commission for Discipline Inspection[4]
In office
1982–1987
Secretary, CPC Committee for Foreign Cultural Relations[4]
In office
1964–1967


Academic responsibilities
Party secretary and Vice President,
Chinese Academy of Sciences[4]
In office
1975–1982
Party secretary and President,
Beijing International Studies University[5]
In office
1964–1967
Party secretary and President,
Harbin Engineering University[6]
In office
1953–1964
This article is about the Chinese politician Li Chang. For the official of the Tang Dynasty, see Li Shizhi.
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Li.

Li Chang (12 December 1914 – 3 September 2010) was an official of the People's Republic of China. He served as the Secretary of Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the CPC from 1982 to 1985, then as member of the Central Advisory Commission of the CPC Central Committee. Li joined the Chinese Communist Party in the 1930s, and later rose in prominence as a reformist.[7] He was one of the key comrades of Deng Xiaoping.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Li Chang, former Secretary of Central Commission for Discipline Inspection passes away". People's Daily (in Chinese). 8 September 2010. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "Obituary from Tsinghua University". 
  3. ^ CRF (2009). ""Prisoner of the State" Roundtable". HRIC. “New China” at 60 (no. 3). Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Li Chang, former Secretary of Central Commission for Discipline Inspection passes away". People's Daily (in Chinese). 8 October 2010. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "Obituary from Beijing International Studies University". 
  6. ^ "Obituary from Harbin Engineering University". 
  7. ^ "CHINA: DEFENSE STATEMENT OF CHEN ZIMING CHINA: DEFENSE STATEMENT OF CHEN ZIMING". Asia Watch (Human Rights Watch) 4 (18). June 1992. 
  8. ^ Teiwes, Frederick C. and Sun, Warren (2007). The End of the Maoist Era: Chinese Politics During the Twilight of the Cultural Revolution, 1972-1976. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 9780765621993.