Liberal Democrats deputy leadership election, 2014

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Liberal Democrats deputy leadership election
United Kingdom
2010 ←
28 January 2014

  Sir Malcolm Bruce Lorely Burt
Candidate Sir Malcolm Bruce Lorely Burt
Party Liberal Democrat Liberal Democrat
Popular vote 28 25
Percentage 50.9 45.5

Deputy Leader before election

Simon Hughes

Elected Deputy Leader

Sir Malcolm Bruce

The 2014 Liberal Democrats deputy leadership election began on 18 December 2013, when the incumbent Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats, Simon Hughes, was appointed Minister of State at the Ministry of Justice, and opted to resign his party position to focus on his new post.[1]

The post was elected by and from the party's 55 Members of Parliament in the House of Commons, who voted on 28 January 2014. (57 Liberal Democrat MPs had been elected at the previous general election, but at the time of the vote, both David Ward and Mike Hancock had had the whip withdrawn.) Lorely Burt was seen as the front-runner,[2] yet veteran MP Sir Malcolm Bruce, who had already announced that he would be standing down at the May 2015 general election, was elected as Deputy Leader on the second round of voting.[3]

Candidates[edit]

Run-up to the election[edit]

The election coincided with the conclusion of Alistair Webster QC's report on the allegations of sexual harassment surrounding the party's former Chief Executive Lord Rennard, and in the weeks leading up to it, the party received extensive coverage surrounding sexual harassment claims against senior party figures including Lord Rennard, MP Mike Hancock,[4][5] former MP Lembit Opik,[6] and AM William Powell.[7] Accordingly, numerous media commentators noted that it appeared highly likely the party would seek to offset criticism of its treatment of women by electing the frontrunner Burt as the party's first woman Deputy Leader, and after receiving 24 nominations, she was described as "the firm favourite".[8][9][10] Consequently, some expressed surprise at Burt's defeat by Bruce, with the Daily Express branding the result "a blunder of Olympian proportions" which left the party open to accusations of being "pale, male and stale".[11]

Result[edit]

First round
Candidate Votes %
Sir Malcolm Bruce 26 48.2
Lorely Burt 25 46.3
Gordon Birtwistle 3 5.6
Not voting 1 1.8
Turnout 54 98.2%

Gordon Birtwistle was eliminated after the first round and his second preferences were redistributed.

Second round
Candidate Change Votes %
Sir Malcolm Bruce +2 28 50.9
Lorely Burt +0 25 45.5
Not voting +1 2 3.6
Turnout 53 96.4%

See also[edit]

References[edit]