Liberalism and radicalism in Romania

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This article gives an overview of Liberalism and Radicalism in Romania. It is limited to liberal parties with substantial support, mainly proved by having had a representation in parliament. The sign ⇒ denotes another party in this scheme. For inclusion in this scheme it is not necessary for a party to have actually labeled itself as a liberal party.

Background[edit]

Liberalism has always during democratic periods been of the major forces in Romania, mainly organized in the National Liberal Party. Often there were spin-offs of this party. At the moment the National Liberal Party (Partidul Naţional Liberal, member LI, ELDR) is a right-wing liberal party.

History[edit]

Precursors[edit]

National Liberal Party[edit]

  • 1875: The liberal current organised itself in the National Liberal Party (Partidul Naţional-Liberal), led by Ion Brătianu
  • 1884: A faction formed the Radical Party, led by C.A. Rosetti and George Panu
  • 1899: The National Liberal Party absorbs the right-wing of the Romanian Social-Democratic Workers' Party
  • 1918: The Peasants' Party absorbs a left-wing tendency in the National Liberal Party formed around Constantin Stere
  • 1929: A faction formed the ⇒ National Liberal Party-Brătianu
  • 1931: A faction formed the Liberal Democratic Party, which remained unsuccessful. The same year a majority of the Brătianu party returned in the National Liberal Party
  • 1938: The rest of the Brătianu party returned in the National Liberal Party
  • 1938: The party is banned by King Carol II
  • 1944: The party resumed its activities
  • 1944: A faction formed the ⇒ National Liberal Party-Tătărescu
  • 1947: The party is banned by the communist regime
  • 1990: The party is refounded by Radu Câmpeanu
  • 1990: A youth faction of the National Liberal Party formed the ⇒ Liberal Party Youth Wing
  • 1991: A faction formed the ⇒ National Liberal Party-Democratic Convention
  • 1995: The ⇒ Liberal party 1993 merged into the National Liberal Party, the ⇒ National Liberal Party-Câmpeanu seceded from the party
  • 1998: The party absorbed the ⇒ Civic Alliance Party
  • 2002: The Alliance for Romania (Alianţa pentru România) merged into the National Liberal Party
  • 2003: The Union of Right-Wing Forces (Uniunea Forţelor de Dreapta) and the ⇒ National Liberal Party-Câmpeanu merged into the party

National Liberal Party-Brătianu[edit]

  • 1929: A faction of the ⇒ National Liberal Party formed the National Liberal Party-Brătianu (Partidul Naţional-Liberal-Brătianu)
  • 1931: Most of the party returned to the National Liberal Party
  • 1938: The party reunited with the National Liberal Party

National Liberal Party-Tătărescu[edit]

From National Liberal Party Youth Wing to Liberal Party 1993[edit]

  • 1990: A youth faction of the ⇒ National Liberal Party formed the National Liberal Party Youth Wing (Partidul Naţional-Liberal Aripa Tînără)
  • 1992: The party was renamed Liberal Party (Partidul Liberal), led by Horia Rusu
  • 1993: The Liberal Party merged with the ⇒ National Liberal Party-Democratic Convention and the Group for Moral and Political Reforms into the Liberal Party 1993 (Partidul Liberal 1993), joined by a faction of the ⇒ Civic Alliance Party
  • 1995: The party merged into the ⇒ National Liberal Party

Civic Alliance Party[edit]

National Liberal Party-Democratic Convention[edit]

National Liberal Party-Câmpeanu[edit]

  • 1995: A faction of the ⇒ National Liberal Party formed the National Liberal Party-Câmpeanu (Partidul Naţional-Liberal-Câmpeanu)
  • 2003: The party merged into the ⇒ National Liberal Party

PNL leaders[edit]

No. Name Term start Term end
1 Ion Brătianu 1875 1891
2 Dumitru Brătianu 1891 1892
3 Dimitrie Sturdza 1892 1908
4 Ion I. C. Brătianu 1908 24 November 1927
5 Vintilă Brătianu November/December 1927 1930
6 Ion Duca 1930 30 December 1933
7 Dinu Brătianu December 1933 1948
none (party abolished by the new communist government) 1948 1990
8 Radu Câmpeanu 1990 1993
9 Mircea Ionescu Quintus 1993 2001
10 Valeriu Stoica 2001 2002
11 Theodor Stolojan 2002 October 2004
12 Călin Popescu-Tăriceanu October 2004 March 2009
13 Crin Antonescu March 2009

See also[edit]

External links[edit]