Liberian general election, 1997

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Liberian presidential election, 1997
Liberia
1985 ←
19 July 1997
→ 2005

  Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, April 2010.jpg
Nominee Charles Taylor Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
Party National Patriotic Unity
Popular vote 468,443 59,557
Percentage 75.33% 9.58%

President before election

Ruth Perry
Independent

Elected President

Charles Taylor
National Patriotic

Coat of arms of Liberia.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Liberia

The 1997 Liberian general election was held on 19 July 1997 as part of the 1996 peace agreement ending the First Liberian Civil War. The presidency, as well as all seats in the House of Representatives and the Senate were up for election. Voter turnout was around 89%.[1]

Former rebel leader Charles Taylor and his National Patriotic Party (NPP) won the election by a substantial margin; Taylor won 75.3% of the vote in the presidential election, whilst the NPP won the same number of votes in the parliamentary election.[2] Taylor was inaugurated as president on 2 August 1997.

Taylor campaigned on the slogan "He killed my ma, he killed my pa, but I will vote for him." [3] The elections were overseen by the United Nations' peacekeeping mission, United Nations Observer Mission in Liberia, along with a contingent from the Economic Community of West African States.[4] Taylor won the election in a landslide, garnering 75 percent of the vote. Taylor's toughest competitor, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, collected only 10 percent of the vote. Taylor's victory has been widely attributed to the belief that he would resume the war if he lost.

Results[edit]

Presidential election[edit]

Candidate Party Number of Votes % of Votes
Charles Taylor National Patriotic Party (NPP) 468,443 75.33%
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Unity Party (UP) 59,557 9.58%
Alhaji G.V. Kromah All Liberia Coalition Party (ALCOP) 25,059 4.02%
Cletus Wotorson Alliance of Political Parties (ALLIANCE) 15,969 2.57%
Gabriel Baccus Matthews United People's Party (UPP) 15,604 2.51%
Togba-Nah Tipoteh Liberian People's Party (LPP) 10,010 1.61%
George Boley National Democratic Party of Liberia (NDPL) 7,843 1.26%
Harry Moniba Liberia National Union (LINU) 6,708 1.08%
George T. Washington People's Democratic Party of Liberia (PDPL) 3,497 0.56
Martin Sheriff National Reformation Party (NRP) 2,965 0.48
Chea Cheapoo Progressive People's Party (PPP) 2,142 0.34
Henry Fahnbulleh Reformation Alliance Party (RAP) 2,067 0.33
Fayah Gbollie Free Democratic Party (FDP) 2,016 0.32
Total 621,880 100

Note: The Alliance of Political Parties was a coalition of the Liberian Action Party (LAP) and Liberia Unification Party (LUP).

Legislative results[edit]

Due to the system of proportional representation used in the election, legislative seats were distributed to parties on the basis of percentage of votes won by their respective presidential candidates.

Party Votes % Seats
Senate House
National Patriotic Party (NPP) 468,443 75.33 21 49
Unity Party (UP) 59,557 9.57 3 7
All Liberia Coalition Party (ALCOP) 25,059 4.03 2 3
Alliance of Political Parties (ALLIANCE) 15,969 2.57 0 2
United People's Party (UPP) 15,604 2.51 0 2
Liberian People's Party (LPP) 10,010 1.61 0 1
National Democratic Party of Liberia 7,843 1.3 0 0
Liberian National Union 6,703 1.1 0 0
People's Democratic Party of Liberia 3,497 0.6 0 0
National Reformation Party 2,965 0.5 0 0
Progressive People's Party 2,142 0.3 0 0
Reformation Alliance Party 2,067 0.3 0 0
Free Democratic Party 2,016 0.3 0 0
Total 621,880 100 26 64
Source: Nohlen et al.

Note: The Alliance of Political Parties was a coalition of the Liberian Action Party (LAP) and Liberia Unification Party (LUP).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Liberia: Parliamentary Chamber: House of Representatives: Elections held in 1997 Inter-Parliamentary Union
  2. ^ Nohlen, D, Krennerich, M & Thibaut, B (1999) Elections in Africa: A data handbook, pp515-518 ISBN 0-19-829645-2
  3. ^ Left, Sarah (2003-08-04). "War in Liberia". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2008-01-18. 
  4. ^ "UNOMIL". Information Technology Section/Department of Public Information. 2001. Retrieved 2008-01-18.